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Follow suit

Follow suit is an idiom that has been in use at least since the early 1800s and comes from a phrase originally used literally. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more … [Read more...]

Bed of roses

Bed of roses is an idiom that has been in use at least since the 1500s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even … [Read more...]

Lick one’s wounds

Lick one's wounds is an idiom that has been in use at least since the 1600s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, … [Read more...]

Dad bod

Dad bod is a new word that entered the lexicon in 2015, and its origin is traced to a particular writer. Dad bod is a compound word, which is a word derived from two separate words used together. New compound words usually consist of two, separate words, and are called open compound words. Midway through their evolution, compound words may acquire hyphens between the two words. When a compound becomes a closed compound word, which consists of two words joined without any hyphen or space, it has … [Read more...]

The lesser of two evils

The term the lesser of two evils has been in use since the 1400s and may be traced to a specific writer, though the concept is probably much older. We will examine the meaning of the phrase the lesser of two evils, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. The expression the lesser of two evils is used when one is confronted with two choices or alternatives, both of them bad. The lesser of two evils means to choose the alternative that is less bad. The term the lesser of … [Read more...]

Aspire vs inspire

Aspire and inspire are two words that are close in spelling and pronunciation, but have very different meanings. They are often confused. We will examine the definitions of aspire and inspire, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Aspire means to hope that one will achieve a certain thing, to attempt to achieve a certain thing, to have the will and the drive to achieve a certain thing. For instance, a student who has a strong desire to learn English may … [Read more...]

Neologism

Neologism is a term used in linguistics since the 1700s. We will examine the meaning of the word neologism, the origin of the word, and some examples of neologisms and the use of the word neologism in sentences. A neologism is a new, coined word or phrase. A neologism is a new word or phrase that has been newly constructed or invented, and is not in wide use. A neologism often begins as jargon or slang in a particular sphere of influence, usually to fill a need created by new technology or … [Read more...]

Hand to mouth

Hand to mouth is an idiom that has been in use at least since the 1600s, though it became quite common during the 1930s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more … [Read more...]

In the loop and out of the loop

In the loop and out of the loop are two idioms that came into use during the 1960s and 1970s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a … [Read more...]

Go over with a fine-tooth comb

The idiom go over with a fine-tooth comb came into use in the mid-1800s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, … [Read more...]

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