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Trepidation

Trepidation is a word that many find confusing. We will examine the definition of the word trepidation, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. Trepidation is a feeling of fear about something that is about to happen or a feeling of fear regarding something one is about to take part in. Trepidation is a feeling of anxiety or apprehension about something one is about to take part in or is about to happen. The word trepidation is derived from the Latin word trepidationem … [Read more...]

The jury is out

The jury is out is an idiom. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of the expression the jury is out, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. The jury is out is an expression that means no decision has been made in a matter, or that the answer to a question is not yet apparent. The phrase is also sometimes rendered as the … [Read more...]

Bohemian

Bohemian is a term that many find confusing. We will examine the definition of the word bohemian, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. The first and most literal definition of Bohemian is a person who lives in or originated in Bohemia, a western region of the Czech Republic. This use of the word Bohemian is always capitalized. However, a more general use of the word bohemian is to signify a person who lives in an unconventional way or behaves in an unconventional … [Read more...]

Impecunious and pecunious

Impecunious and pecunious may be used as antonyms, though with a twist. Antonyms are two or more words that have opposing meanings. We will examine the definitions of impecunious and pecunious, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Impecunious describes someone who does not have money, someone who is of meager means and is not well off. Someone who is impecunious may be considered penniless. The word impecunious is derived from the prefix im- meaning … [Read more...]

Shoot the breeze

Shoot the breeze is an idiom that originated in the United States. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the meaning of the expression shoot the breeze, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. To shoot the breeze means to chat about inconsequential manners, to converse casually in order to pass the time or simply entertain each other. … [Read more...]

Sedimentary vs sedentary

Sedimentary and sedentary are two words that are close in pronunciation and spelling, but have very different meanings. We will examine the definitions of sedimentary and sedentary, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Sedimentary describes something that has to do with sediment. Most often, sedimentary is used to describe a certain type of rock that is made up of the mud and silt deposited by the movement of water and wind, which hardens into rock. … [Read more...]

Thoroughbred vs purebred

Thoroughbred and purebred are two words that are often confused. We will examine the definitions of thoroughbred and purebred, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Thoroughbred is a breed of horse. The Thoroughbred is the breed of horse most often used in horse racing. The Thoroughbred was developed from a cross between English brood mares and imported Arabian stallions in the seventeenth century. The word thoroughbred is also used as an idiom to describe … [Read more...]

Beat swords into plowshares and beat swords into ploughshares

The idioms beat swords into plowshares and beat swords into ploughshares are very old. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of the terms beat swords into plowshares and beat swords into ploughshares, where they came from and some examples of their use in sentences. The expression beat swords into plowshares means to allocate one's resources … [Read more...]

Lain vs lane

Lain and lane are two words that are pronounced in the same manner but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the definitions of lain and lane, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Lain is the past participle lie, meaning to rest in a horizontal position, to recline in a prone position. The word lie is derived from the Old English word licgan which means to be at rest. A lane is a narrow … [Read more...]

Fifth wheel vs third wheel

Fifth wheel and third wheel are two idioms that many find confusing. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definitions of fifth wheel and third wheel, where these terms came from and some examples of their use in sentences. A fifth wheel is someone who is unnecessary to the group, someone who is tagging along with a group of people and is not altogether … [Read more...]

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