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Microfinance, microcredit and microloan

Microfinance, microcredit and microloan are terms that came into use in the mid-1970s when these practices were pioneered. We will examine the definitions of the terms microfinance, microcredit and microloan, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Microfinance is a system of banking services made available to clients who are not served by traditional banks because of their location and poverty. Usually, the mission of microfinancing institutions is to aid … [Read more...]

Nun vs none

Nun and none are two words that are pronounced in the same manner but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are homophones. We will examine the difference between the definitions of nun and none, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. A nun is a woman who belongs to a religious congregation, especially one in which the woman takes a vow of poverty, chastity and obedience. Nuns are most commonly Roman Catholic, though other religions also … [Read more...]

Nicks vs nix

Nicks and nix are two words that are pronounced in the same manner but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the difference between the definitions of nicks and nix, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Nicks is the plural form of the noun nick and the second person present tense of the verb nick. Nick, when used as a noun may mean a small, accidental cut. It is also used in British slang to mean … [Read more...]

Straight from the shoulder

Straight from the shoulder is an idiom that dates from the late 1800s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal meaning. We will examine the definition of the term straight from the shoulder, where the phrase came from and some examples of its use in sentences. Straight from the shoulder means in an honest fashion, in a frank way, straightforward. The idiom straight from the shoulder is an idiom that is derived from … [Read more...]

Push someone’s buttons

Push someone's buttons is an American idiom that first appeared in the 1920s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal meaning. We will examine the definition of push someone's buttons, where the term came from and some examples of its use in sentences. To push someone's buttons means to do something that results in an immediate reaction from someone, to do or say something that arouses an instantaneous and usually … [Read more...]

Precocious vs precious

Precocious and precious are two words that are often confused. We will examine the difference between the definitions of precocious and precious, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Precocious describes a child who displays an ability, talent or inclination at a younger age than is usual. Precocious describes being more developed or more mature than one's age would suggest. Precocious is an adjective, the comparative and superlative are more precocious and … [Read more...]

Staff vs staph

Staff and staph are two words that are pronounced in the same manner but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are homophones. We will examine the difference between the definitions of staff and staph, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. The word staff may mean 1.) the group of people working for a particular organization or company 2.) hiring a group of people to work for a particular organization or company 3.) a long stick used … [Read more...]

Mary Sue

Mary Sue is a term that has recently been added to the Oxford English Dictionary. We will examine the definition of the term Mary Sue, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. A Mary Sue is a fictional character who is so perfect as to be unrealistic. A Mary Sue is a character who has no weaknesses, who performs heroically and perfectly in every situation. This sort of character is usually considered to be a form of wish-fulfillment on the part of the author, and is a … [Read more...]

Kin vs ken

Kin and ken are two words that are oftened confused. We will examine the difference between the definitions of kin and ken, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Kin means one's friends and relations, or the same species of an animal or plant. Kin is used as a noun or an adjective. Kin is derived from the Old English word cynn, which means race, kind or family. The plural form of kin is kin. Ken means the scope of one's knowledge, what one understands, to … [Read more...]

Cashmere vs Kashmir

Cashmere and Kashmir are two terms that are intricately related, but mean two different things today. They may be pronounced in the same fashion but are spelled differently, and they are homophones. We will examine the difference between cashmere and Kashmir, where these terms came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Cashmere refers to a type of wool that is very fine and and soft. Cashmere wool comes from the cashmere goat, which is a certain type of goat found in the Kashmir … [Read more...]

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