Advertisement

Factious vs fractious

Factious and fractious are two words that are very close in spelling and pronunciation, but have different meanings. We will examine the definitions of the words factious and fractious, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences, Factious means tending toward dissension, producing partisanship or division. Factious is an adjective, the noun form is faction. Factious is derived from the Latin word factiosus, which means partisan, leaning toward forming political … [Read more...]

Flagellants vs flatulence

Flagellants and flatulence are two words that are very close in pronunciation and are often confused. We will examine the definitions of the words flagellants and flatulence, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Flagellants is the plural form of flagellant, which is someone who flogs himself as an expression of religious fervor. Various religious cults have practiced flagellation in the past, such as the cult dedicated to Isis and the cult dedicated to … [Read more...]

Jaundiced eye

The idiom jaundiced eye goes back to the 1600s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal meaning. We will examine the definition of the phrase jaundiced eye, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. To look at something with a jaundiced eye means to look upon something with prejudice, usually in a cynical or negative way. Someone who looks upon something with a jaundiced eye is most often … [Read more...]

Empire vs umpire

Empire and umpire are two words that are very close in pronunciation and spelling and are often confused. We will examine the definitions of empire and umpire, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. An empire is a vast sovereign state, usually consisting of many smaller states or countries and ruled by one person. Today, empire is also used to mean a large corporation that is run by one person, or is used figuratively to mean a sphere of influence controlled … [Read more...]

Excited vs exited

Excited and exited are two words that are very close in spelling and pronunciation, and are often confused. We will examine the definitions of excited and exited, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Excited is the past tense of the word excite, which means to make someone feel eager, enthusiastic or sexually aroused. Related words are excites, exciting. Excited is also used as an adjective. The word excite is derived from the Latin word excitare, which … [Read more...]

Primrose path

Primrose path is an idiom that goes back to at least the early 1600s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal meaning. We will examine the definition of primrose path, where the term came from and some examples of its use in sentences. Primrose path refers to a way of life that is easy and pleasant, but in fact, leads to one's destruction or some other consequence. It is often expressed as leading someone down the … [Read more...]

Whirl vs whorl

Whirl and whorl are two words that are pronounced in the same manner but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the definitions of whirl and whorl, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Whirl means a quick movement going round and round or a flurry of activity, or to move quickly, going round and round or to frantically participate in an activity. Whirl is used as a noun or a verb, related words are … [Read more...]

Screwball

Screwball is primarily an American term, though its origins actually date to the early 1800s in Britain. We will examine the meaning of the term screwball, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. Screwball may be used as a noun to refer to an eccentric, unpredictable or mentally unstable person. When used as an adjective, screwball describes something that is crazy, eccentric or absurd. The word screwball also refers to a type of pitch in baseball. Interestingly, a … [Read more...]

Take the cake

The idiom take the cake has its roots in Ancient Greece, though it did not come into common use until the 1800s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal meaning. We will examine the definition of the phrase take the cake, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. To take the cake means to receive the top honors in a situation, though the phrase is most often used sarcastically to mean being the … [Read more...]

Wood vs would

Wood and would are two words that are pronounced in the same manner but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the definitions of wood and would, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Wood is the hard material that makes up the trunk of a tree and its branches or the limbs of a shrub. Wood is used as fuel and as a building or decorative material. Wood is also a term for a certain type of golf club as … [Read more...]

About Grammarist
Contact | Privacy policy | Home
© Copyright 2009-2014 Grammarist