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Round robin

The term round robin has a general definition that is used in many different situations. We'll look at the meaning of the term round robin, different ways this term is used, the origin of the term and some examples of its use in sentences. A round robin is a sequence or series that involves the participation of everyone in a group. The term round robin is currently most often used to refer to a tournament in which every participant has the opportunity to play every other participant in the … [Read more...]

Strop vs strap

Strop and strap are two words that are spelled and are pronounced in similar ways but do not mean exactly the same thing. We'll look at the difference in meaning between the words strop and strap, their origins and some examples of their use in sentences. The word strop may refer to two different items. The first item is a razor strop, which is a length of rough leather used to sharpen razor blades. The second item known as a strop is a rope or metal band used in moving cargo. In addition, … [Read more...]

Subjugated vs subjected to

Subjugated and subjected to are two different words that are easily confused. While the spellings of these terms are very similar, they mean two different things. We will examine the difference in meaning between the words subjugated and subjected to, the origins of these two terms, and look at some examples of their use in sentences. Subjugated means to be forced to submit, to be conquered, to be made subordinate. When someone is subjugated, he must acquiesce or bow to the conqueror's will. … [Read more...]

Carbon copy

Carbon copy is a term that is still in use, though the process that it was originally describing has all but disappeared. We will look at the meaning of the compound word carbon copy, its origins, and some examples of how it is used in sentences. A carbon copy is an exact duplicate of something. Originally, a carbon copy described a copy of a typed document made by placing a piece of carbon paper between two pieces of typewriter paper, the bottom document was the carbon copy. Carbon paper was … [Read more...]

Overtake, take over and takeover

The terms overtake, take over and takeover are similar, but mean very different things. We'll look at the meaning of overtake, take over and takeover, the origin of the terms and how to use them in sentences. Overtake means to catch up with someone or something in front of you and pass him. Overtake may also mean to become more successful than something or someone else, or to be overcome by something or someone. The word overtake has been in the English language since the 1200s, the original … [Read more...]

Lyme disease vs lime disease

Lyme disease and lime disease are two ailments that are pronounced in the same way and almost spelled in the same way, but describe two different diseases. We'll look at the difference between Lyme disease and lime disease, the origins of these terms, and some examples of their use in sentences. Lyme disease is a chronic, debilitating disease that if left untreated has serious consequences. In a victim, the disease is transmitted in a tick bite that transfers the bacterium Borrelia … [Read more...]

Juggernaut

Juggernaut is a word with an interesting origin, derived from Hindi. We'll look at the meaning of the word juggernaut, its origins, and some examples of its use in sentences. Juggernaut means an overwhelming force or all-encompassing institution, a powerful force or institution that demands self-sacrifice or destroys all in its path. In British English, a juggernaut might describe a large, heavy truck, especially a tractor trailer. The word juggernaut is derived from the word Jagannatha, a … [Read more...]

Come-to-Jesus moment and come-to-Jesus meeting

Come-to-Jesus moment and come-to-Jesus meeting are two idioms that began as literal exhortations involving the religious figure Jesus. Today, the terms also hold a figurative meaning. We'll examine the literal and figurative meanings of come-to-Jesus moment and come-to-Jesus meeting, where the terms come from, and look at some examples of their use in sentences. A come-to-Jesus moment may refer to the moment in which a person has a religious conversion and dedicates his life to Jesus. … [Read more...]

Grin like a Cheshire cat

The idiom grin like a Cheshire cat was popularized by the children's story Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, published in 1865. However, Carroll did not invent the term grin like a Cheshire cat. We'll look at the meaning of this term, its probable origins, and some examples of the phrase's use in a few sentences. To grin like a Cheshire cat means to smile broadly. Some definitions of the term stipulate that the smile must be so broad as to expose the gums. The idiom grin like … [Read more...]

Hour vs our

Hour and our are two words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are homophones. We'll look at the definitions of hour and our, where the words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. An hour is a measurement of time. An hour is sixty minutes long, or one twenty-fourth of a day. The word hour may also be used to indicate a certain time of day according to the clock or a certain period of time that is allotted for a … [Read more...]

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