Annunciation vs enunciation

Annunciation and enunciation are two words that are close in spelling and pronunciation and may be considered confusables. We will examine the different meanings of the confusables annunciation and enunciation, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences.

Annunciation means the act of announcing something or making an announcement. The Annunciation, spelled with a capital A, refers to the event where the archangel Gabriel announced to Mary that she was pregnant with Jesus; the feast day, also known as Lady Day, is March 25. Annunciation is rarely used in a generic context; the word announcement is much more common. The word annunciation is derived from the Old French word, anonciacion, which means news or an announcement. Related words are announce, announces, announced, announcing, announcement.

Enunciation is the act of pronouncing something clearly or proclaiming something plainly and distinctly. The word enunciation is derived from the Latin word, enuntiationem, which means a declaration. Related words are enunciate, enunciates, enunciated, enunciating.

Examples

It was the holiest object in Old Testament Israel and when Luke tells the story of the Annunciation, he carefully records language meant to link Mary to it. (Catholic Weekly)

Many houses were left without electricity and water for days, while the Annunciation (Evangelismos) Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Houston, where the first Greek church in the area was built 108 years ago, also sustained damage. (National Herald)

But in pronouncing that short sentence, my enunciation was so done with such gusto that I accidentally blew the candle out. (Orange County Tribune)

Students will be instructed and trained to understand the relationship between sounds and spellings, and more importantly, the difference in pronunciation and enunciation of words and phrases. (Tribune India)

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