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Close-knit and tight-knit

  • Close-knit and tight-knit are compound words that are synonyms.  A compound word is composed of two or more words used together. Synonyms are word that have the same or nearly the same meaning. We will examine the definition of close-knit and tight-knit, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences.


     

    Close-knit and tight-knit are adjectives that describe people who have strong bonds, people who are are closely bound together through cultural, political, social or family ties. The adverb forms are closely-knit and tightly-knit. The comparitive forms may be closer-knit and tighter-knit, or more close-knit and more tight-knit. The superlative forms may be closest-knit and tightest-knit or most close-knit and most tight-knit. The term close-knit first appeared in the 1920s, and the term tight-knit first appeared in the 1940s. Note that both close-knit and tight-knit are rendered with hyphens.

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    Examples

    Although many students knew the program’s size would be small, they did not expect to become a part of such a close-knit community. (The Daily Nebraskan)

    But it’s after the dust and tear gas settle that the film kicks into gear, as Hamadi follows three closely-knit activists who have suffered in different ways and take different approaches to changing their future. (The Hollywood Reporter)

    The tight-knit group of 15 will perform songs by Billy Joel, Ella Fitzgerald and from the musical Les Misérables, according to Rosie Arbittier. (The York Dispatch)

    Juicy Folks director Alvin Tam backs a tighter-knit food production sector and would like to see an industry cluster that is “vertically integrated” from raw material supply to last-mile delivery. His company is a joint venture of juice vendor Squeez
    Juicy Folks director Alvin Tam backs a tighter-knit food production sector and would like to see an industry cluster that is “vertically integrated” from raw material supply to last-mile delivery. (The Straits Times)


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