Alison Page

Grammarist Writer

Alison has published two novels in the Teen Fiction and Erotica genres and has ghost-written several non-fiction equestrian books for a client. Alison has been a full-time professional content writer for almost ten years and loves her work as a wordsmith.

She lives in the beautiful rural UK county of Cheshire with her fiancé, two cats, one super cute Shihpoo dog called Raffles, and a collection of tropical fish. When Alison isn’t busy creating content or contemplating plotlines for future novels, she can be found hiking along woodland trails or beaches with Raffles, judging dressage competitions, or reading crime fiction.

Experience

Alison has worked full-time in the writing industry for over ten years, using her knowledge and life experience to create online content, fiction and non-fiction.

Before changing tack and moving into writing professionally, she worked in law enforcement, sales, veterinary practice management, and various administration roles. In the 1990s, Alison was a copyeditor for the WCCTG monthly independent magazine and now regularly assists budding authors by compiling, proofreading, and editing their work.

Education

Alison holds a BA Hons in English Language, a BSc in Equine Science, and an HND in Business Studies and Communications. Additionally, she possesses an OU Creative Writing Certificate and is a DirectMarketer Certified DirectResponse Copywriting Specialist.

More recently, Alison gained a UK qualification in Funeral Celebrancy and now specializes in writing Eulogies and creating funeral services.

Alison Page

More From Alison Page

Idiom

Fell Into My Lap—When Life Surprises You

Fell into my lap means something unexpected or fortunate happened without any effort on your part; it simply came to you easily. Idiomatic expressions like fell into my lap are colorful phrases used in language, often with figurative meanings that …
Take That to the Bank—A Guide to Teaching Reliable Statements 2

Idiom

Take That to the Bank—A Guide to Teaching Reliable Statements

Take that to the bank is an idiom used to say that something is reliable, certain, or trustworthy. It is often used to emphasize the validity or truthfulness of a statement or promise. Idioms like take that to the bank …
Decoding Under the Radar—From Unnoticed to Understood

Idiom

Decoding Under the Radar—From Unnoticed to Understood

Under the radar, off the radar, below the radar, beneath the radar, and above the radar are related idioms that describe the extent to which something is noticeable, whether in terms of its significance, perception, or the amount of attention …
Caught in the Crosshairs – Targeted Scrutiny or Unwanted Blame 2

Idiom

Caught in the Crosshairs – Targeted Scrutiny or Unwanted Blame?

Caught in the crosshairs is an idiom that means to be a target for attack, criticism, or some other form of negative attention. It is a relatively modern idiom considered to be less than 100 years old.  In English, idioms, …
Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel—How to Express Poor Quality 2

Idiom

Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel—How to Express Poor Quality

Scraping the bottom of the barrel is an idiom that means using something of very poor quality because that is all that is left. Idioms like this one are figurative expressions or phrases with meanings that go beyond the literal …

Idiom

When the Chips Are Down—Facing Tough Times

When the chips are down means facing a difficult situation or a moment of crisis. It implies dealing with challenges or making critical decisions during tough times. English language idioms such as when the chips are down are expressions that …
Come Hell Or High Water – An Expression Of Perseverance 2

Idiom

Come Hell Or High Water – An Expression Of Perseverance

Come hell or high water is an idiom that means one will complete a task or be successful whatever happens. The phrase underscores a commitment to overcoming any obstacles that may arise on the path to one’s goal. Idioms, like …
Clean Slate – An English Idiom for New Beginnings 2

Idiom

Clean Slate – An English Idiom for New Beginnings

Clean slate is an idiom that pertains to starting again freely, without considering past mistakes or failures. Idioms like this are expressions or phrases used figuratively to convey a point, diverging from their literal meanings. Mastering the art of using …

Idiom

In My Element Idiom Explained—Defining Comfort

In my element means feeling comfortable, confident, and happy in a particular situation or environment. It’s like being where you belong and thriving. Idioms, such as in my element, are special phrases or expressions that mean something different from the …
Pull The Wool Over Your Eyes – A Simple Phrase Or A Way To Fool Someone 2

Idiom

Pull The Wool Over Your Eyes – A Simple Phrase Or A Way To Fool Someone?

Pull the wool over your eyes is an idiom that means to fool, trick, or take advantage of someone. This informal phrase is typically used to convey the idea of fooling someone using deception. Idioms like pull the wool over …
Put Ones Finger on Something—An Idiom of Precise Understanding 2

Idiom

Put One’s Finger on Something—An Idiom of Precise Understanding

To put one’s finger on something means to identify or pinpoint something precisely, often referring to understanding or recognizing a specific issue, problem, or aspect. Idioms such as put one’s finger on something are phrases or expressions whose meaning cannot …
Welcome to the Club—An Idiom Exploring Solidarity

Idiom

Welcome to the Club—An Idiom Exploring Solidarity

Welcome to the club is a casual and often humorous way of expressing solidarity or shared experience with someone who has just encountered a particular situation, difficulty, or challenge. Idioms like this are expressions or phrases with meanings that cannot …
Six of One Half a Dozen of the Other – Breaking Down Similarity 2

Idiom

Six of One, Half a Dozen of the Other – Breaking Down Similarity

Six of one, half a dozen of the other is an idiom used to express that two alternatives or choices are essentially equivalent or that the differences between them are negligible. Idioms, like six of one, half a dozen of …
In High Cotton—Exploring an Idiom of Wealth and Success 2

Idiom

In High Cotton—Exploring an Idiom of Wealth and Success

In high cotton means being in a favorable or prosperous situation. It’s like being in a good place or doing well in life. An idiom, such as high cotton, is a phrase that has a figurative meaning beyond its literal …
Curl Ones Hair—From Fear to Fascination 2

Idiom

Curl One’s Hair—From Fear to Fascination

Curl someone’s hair means to frighten or shock someone. It conveys a strong emotional reaction, often of surprise, shock, or fear. English language idioms such as curl someone’s hair are phrases or expressions typically used in a figurative sense to …
Shuffle off This Mortal Coil—Exploring the Afterlife 2

Idiom

Shuffle off This Mortal Coil—Exploring the Afterlife

Shuffle off this mortal coil simply means to die. This idiomatic expression specifically entails ridding yourself of the trials and tribulations of daily life, and dying is the only way you can truly do that. Idioms are expressions meant to …