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Knight vs night

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  • Knight and night are two words that are pronounced the same way but are spelled differently and mean two different things. They are homophones. We’ll examine the difference between the words knight and night, their origins, and look at a few examples of their use in sentences.

    A knight was a man who served as a mounted, armored soldier during the Middle Ages. Today, a knight is a gentleman bestowed with the rank of knight by a sovereign because of his service or because of his merit. A man who attains such a rank may use the title Sir before his name. The word knight is also used to designate a particular chess piece that sports a horse head. Knight is also used figuratively to mean a man who is a champion or a protector. Knight is also used as a verb to describe bestowing the title of knight upon someone. Derived from the Old English word cniht, the k sound in knight has long gone silent. Related words are knights, knighted, knighting, knighthood.

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    Night is the time between sunset and sunrise, the opposite of day. Night may be used as an adverb to signify that something takes place at night. The word night is also used to describe something that is gloomy or dark. Night is derived from the Old English words neaht, niht.

    Examples

    Like Brown, who works as a head knight at Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament in Hanover, there are many others whose jobs and pastimes transport them back into a different age without the aid of a time machine. (The Baltimore Sun)

    While filming Night At The Museum 3, “Robin was having trouble remembering even one line for his scenes, while just three years prior he had played in a full five-month season of the Broadway production Bengal Tiger At The Baghdad Zoo, often doing two shows a day with hundreds of lines – and not one mistake”, she writes in a personal essay titled The Terrorist Inside My Husband’s Brain, published in the medical journal Neurology. (The Sydney Morning Herald)

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