Homophones

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Wright vs write

Wright and write are commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the different meanings of the homophonic words wright and write, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Wright means a builder or a maker of a certain thing, such as a wheelwright or a shipwright. Wright is an archaic term derived from the Old English word, wryhta, which …

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Rah vs raw

Rah and raw are commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the different meanings of the homophonic words rah and raw, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Rah is a word used as a cheer of encouragement. Rah is primarily a North American term; it began as an abbreviation of the word, hurrah, and came into use in …

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Bused, bussed, or bust

Bused, bussed, and bust are commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the different meanings of the homophonic words bused, bussed and bust, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Bused is the past tense of the verb, bus, meaning to transport on a large vehicle known as a bus. Bused is also used in North America to mean …

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Want vs wont

Want and wont are commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the different meanings of the homophonic words want and wont, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Want, when used as a noun, means a lack of something or a desire for something. Want, when used as a verb, means to desire something or to wish for something. …

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Praise vs prays

Praise and prays are commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the different meanings of the homophonic words praise and prays, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Praise may mean an expression of love, gratitude and admiration toward a deity, or a type of prayer. Praise may also mean an expression of respect or admiration toward something or …

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Bot vs bought

Bot and bought are commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the different meanings of the homophonic words bot and bought, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Bot is an abbreviation and may signify a robot or a chatbot. A robot is a machine that completes repetitive tasks; a chatbot is a a computer program that simulates interactive human …

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Toad vs towed

Toad and towed are commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the different meanings of the homophonic words toad and towed, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. A toad is an amphibian; it has dry, warty skin that may excrete poison. A toad is stocky with short legs, a broad nose, and no teeth. It lives primarily on land, …

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Serious vs sirius

Serious and sirius are commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the different meanings of the homophonic words serious and sirius, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Serious is an adjective that describes something solemn, profound, or important. Something that is serious should be considered and pondered carefully; it should not be thought about in a …

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Bode vs bowed

Bode and bowed are commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the different meanings of the homophonic words bode and bowed, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Bode means to be an omen or to be a harbinger of a future event. The word bode is often used in the phrases does not bode well and …

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Enfold vs infold

Enfold and infold are commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the different meanings of the homophonic words enfold and infold, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Enfold means to surround or envelop something; to wrap something up or enclose something. For instance, if someone wraps his arms around you, he may be said to enfold …

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