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Eaves vs eves

Eaves and eves are two words that are pronounced in the same manner but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are homophones. We will look at the definitions of the words eaves and eves, where they came from and some examples of their use in sentences.

Eaves are the lower edges of a roof, often overhanging the walls of the building. Eaves is the plural form of eave, which is rarely used except as an adjective before a noun. The word eaves is derived from the Old English word efes, which means edge of a roof.


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Eves is the plural of eve, which is a period of time before a holiday, celebration or other occasion, most often the day before a holiday, celebration or other occasion. Eve is also a poetic form of the word evening, as well as a woman’s name when capitalized as in Eve. Around 1200, the word eve came into use as a shortening of the word even, which in turn was a shortening of the word evening. Eve came into use to mean a day before a holiday or celebration by the end of the thirteenth century.

Examples

For instance, icicles forming on the eaves trough may be beautiful to look at, but can often be the result of a serious problem inside the home’s roof. (The Portland Press Herald)

The dividing line is indicated by a 600 millimetre wide strip of roof glazing that completely separates the buildings just below the eave line, and delivers light from one of many new overhead skylights. (The Canberra Times)

New CIA director Mike Pompeo met with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank Tuesday night to hear concerns about the fate of the so-called two-state solution to peace on the eve of a meeting in Washington between President Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, according to media reports. (USA Today)

The man facing charges for a crash on Christmas Eve of 2015 in Clarkson that turned deadly was sentenced on Tuesday. (The Wayne Post)

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