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Newbie vs noob or n00b

  • Newbie and noob or n00b are words that may be found in the dictionary with similar meanings, but very different connotations. We will examine the difference between the definitions for newbie, noob and n00b, their etymology, and some examples of their use in sentences.


     

    A newbie is a person who is inexperienced in a particular realm, someone who is new to a situation or organization. The term newbie is believed to have been derived from the word newie that was popular in the 1850s in the United States and in Australia. The term newbie first became popular during the Vietnam era to describe a new member of a military group. The word became more widespread during the 1980s when it came to be used to mean someone who was new to playing a video game or to learning computing. The expression newbie is simply an expression of one’s elack of experience, and carries no negative connotation. The plural form is newbies.

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    The word noob or n00b came into popular use at the turn of the twenty-first century, but was coined on internet bulletin boards in the 1980s. Noob or n00b also means a person who is inexperienced or is new to a situation or organization, but the derogatory term entered the lexicon to describe someone who was unwilling to learn or who didn’t listen to other, more experienced gamers or computer users and programmers. A noob or n00b is considered obnoxious or hopeless. The words noob and n00b carry negative connotations, and may be considered insults. N00b is an example of Leet or leetspeak, an internet language or internet slang composed of letters, numbers and symbols from the American Standard Code for Information Interchange to compose words and phrases that confound text filters. The word leet was derived from the word elite, alluding to the elite status proficient computer users attained. The terms noob and n00b have been nominated to be considered the word of the year by various organizations. The plural form is noobs or n00bs.

    Examples

    But viewers joked that she had snuck back into the villa disguised as newbie Francesca as they noted the similarities between the pair. (The Mirror)

    What’s worse, perhaps, is when a newbie tries to tackle said trail with equipment they aren’t familiar with, such as clipless pedals – the type where you are connected to the bike via a cleat on your shoe that needs to be disengaged with a “learned” movement of your foot. (The St, George News)

    Despite feeling like a noob who had put the fans on the wrong way the first time around, it is always better to take advice and try it out with the hope of improved results rather than sulk. (My Broadband)

    Just don’t be a noob and ride if the ground has turned muddy, which can rut up and damage the trail. (Outside Magazine)

    Kenneth was a n00b to management, and said he was looking for ways to raise morale – and thought he’d hit upon a great idea. (The Register)


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