As right as rain

The phrase as right as rain is an idiom. We will examine the meaning of the idiom as right as rain, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.

As right as rain describes someone in fine health, something in good working order, an idea that is correct, or a process that flows smoothly. As right as rain is also a simile, which is a phrase used in a sentence that is a comparison of one thing with something else using the word like or the word as.  The word right, in this case, means straight, a common medieval definition of the word right. Many idioms using this meaning of the word right preceded the idiom right as rain, including the idioms right as nails, right as a book, and right as my leg. The idiom right as rain was first used in the late 1800s and is still a popular expression, surely because of the pleasing alliteration.

Examples

I’ll keep tracking this to see if the speculation is right as rain or if it will go flat. (The Post Bulletin)

The bees look right as rain,” she says. (The Coast Mountain News)

TUCK IN EARLY ON A FRIDAY, RELAX OVER THE WEEKEND AND MONDAY YOU ARE RIGHT AS RAIN (The Namibia Economist)

He knew, we once wrote, that Mrs. Thatcher knew that the newspaper’s editorials on Hong Kong were as right as rain. (The New York Sun)

Elvis Costello has said he is feeling “right as rain” and “extremely lucky” after his cancer operation. (The Irish Examiner)

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