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Road hog

Road hog is an idiom that dates back decades. We will examine the meaning of the common idiom road hog, where it came from, and some examples of its idiomatic usage in sentences. A road hog is a driver of a vehicle who takes up more than his fair share of …

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Reef vs wreath

Reef and wreath are two words that are close in spelling and pronunciation and may be considered confusables. We will examine the different meanings of the confusables reef and wreath, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. A reef is a deposit of rock or coral near …

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Weigh in

Weigh in is an idiom that dates back decades. We will examine the meaning of the common idiom weigh in, where it came from, and some examples of its idiomatic usage in sentences. Weigh in is an idiom that means to bring one’s influence to bear in a discussion or argument. …

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Heavy-handed

Heavy-handed is an idiom that is also a compound word. We will examine the meaning of the common idiom heavy-handed, where it came from, and some examples of its idiomatic usage in sentences. Heavy-handed means overbearing, harsh, excessive, and forceful. Heavy-handed also means clumsy, inept, awkward, or tactless. Something that is …

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Rah vs. Raw

Rah and raw are commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the different meanings of the homophonic words rah and raw, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Rah …

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When the going gets tough, the tough get going

When the going gets tough, the tough get going is a proverb that is a little over 50 years old. We will examine the meaning of the proverb when the going gets tough, the tough get going, where the expression came from, and some examples of its use in sentences. When the going …

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Scrapped vs scraped

Scrapped and scraped are two words that are close in spelling and pronunciation and may be considered confusables. We will examine the different meanings of the confusables scrapped and scraped, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Scrapped, pronounced with a short a, means to have thrown something …

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Move the needle

Move the needle is an idiom that is several decades old. We will examine the meaning of the common idiom move the needle, where it came from, and some examples of its idiomatic usage in sentences. Move the needle is an idiom that means to make a change that is noticeable, …

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Estimate vs estimate

Estimate and estimate  are two words that are spelled identically but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, which makes them heteronyms. We will examine the definitions of the words estimate and estimate, where these words came from, and a few examples of their use in sentences.  Estimate (ESS tuh mate) means to make a …

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Penance vs pittance

Penance and pittance are two words that are close in spelling and pronunciation and may be considered confusables. We will examine the different meanings of the confusables penance and pittance, the word origins of the terms, and some examples of their English usage in sentences. Penance is reparation for a transgression; it is punishment or a discipline …

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