Nevertheless vs nonetheless

Nevertheless and nonetheless are compound words that are made up of three words. We will examine the meaning of the words nevertheless and nonetheless, when they should be used, their etymology, and some examples of their use in a sentence or two.

Nevertheless means in spite of, in contrast to, or notwithstanding. Nevertheless is an adverb that has been in use since the 1300s. It is a closed compound word formed from the words never, the, and less. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, nevertheless and nonetheless are interchangeable; however, strict grammarians insist that nevertheless should be used when referring to something that has occurred, is occurring, or might occur.

Nonetheless means in spite of, in contrast to, or notwithstanding. Nonetheless is an adverb that was coined in the 1830s; it did not become popular until the 1930s. It is a closed compound word formed from the words none, the, and less. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, nonetheless and nevertheless are interchangeable; however, strict grammarians insist that nonetheless should be used when to referring to an amount or something that is measurable.

Examples

Nevertheless, Clyburn, who has urged Biden to pick an African American as his running mate, has made clear that is not an absolute requirement for him. (The Washington Post)

Nevertheless the press on Friday blamed the spike in infections and deaths on Bolsonaro, who has encouraged people to go out to work to prevent an economic crash and whose most fervent supporters have taken to the streets to protest against lockdown orders. (New Straits Times)

Nevertheless, I would prefer to be able to take a vaccine to beat the virus rather than rely on the law of averages. (The Jamestown Post-Journal)

People love him nonetheless, or maybe they love him more because of it. (Newsday)

It nonetheless looks impressively strong next to the 0.7% annual rate averaged during last year’s second half. (Forbes Magazine)

Coronavirus is a threat, but not an existential one, nonetheless there are grim days ahead (The Australian)