Advertisement

Currently

The adverb currently is almost always unnecessary. It usually just restates information already conveyed through verb tenses and can be dropped with no loss of meaning. Consider these examples:

A 31-year-old Pennsylvania man is currently in stable condition after leaping off a Manhattan-bound Staten Island Ferry yesterday evening. [Gothamist]

The Denver Zoo is currently training three of its gorillas to be the newest members of the Great Ape Heart Project. [Denver Post]

Sarah Palin, theoretically the Tea Party powerhouse, currently ranks ninth. [Daily Caller]

The Rockets currently have an overall record of 19-6 and 11-1 in the MAC. [Ball State Daily News]

Applications are currently being accepted for the annual Max Nuscher Award. [The Mercury]

In each case, the removal of currently would have no effect on the sentence’s meaning.

Advertisement

But currently can be useful when contrasting current conditions with past or future conditions—for example:

St. Peter’s currently has 105 students, and enrollment was expected to drop to fewer than 95 students in September. [NY Times]

But such instances are relatively rare.

Advertisement

Check Your Text

Speak Your Mind

About Grammarist
Contact | Privacy policy | Home
© Copyright 2009-2014 Grammarist