Advertisement

Poseur vs poser

  • Poseur and poser are two words that many find confusing because they are very similar in spelling and pronunciation. Poseur and poser have different definitions, but are becoming increasingly interchangeable in certain circumstances. Poseur is pronounced with the accent on the second syllable, and poser is pronounced with the accent on the first syllable. We will examine the difference between the meanings of the words poseur and poser, where these terms came from, and some examples of their use in sentences.


     

    A poseur is someone who pretends to be something he is not, a person who puts on airs or tries to project the attitude or appearance of someone more important or more accomplished than he truly is. For instance, someone who pretends to be a Harvard graduate by wearing a branded Harvard sweatshirt and dropping the names of buildings around the Harvard campus is a poseur. Calling someone a poseur is an insult because it insinuates that the person is a liar, a sneak, or delusional. The word poseur is derived from the French, like the words raconteur and liqueur.

    Advertisement

    A poser is someone who poses, like someone who is serving as a model for an artist or someone who is being photographed. Poser is also a British term for a brainteaser, puzzle, or difficult question, especially one that is very challenging to solve. Finally, the word poser is increasingly used interchangeably with the word poseur, meaning someone who pretends to be something he is not, a person who puts on airs or tries to project the attitude or appearance of someone who is more important or more accomplished than he truly is. The word poser is a back-formation from the verb pose.


    About Grammarist
    Contact | Privacy policy | Home
    © Copyright 2009-2014 Grammarist