To err is human; to forgive, divine


To err is human; to forgive, divine
 is a proverb with ancient roots. We will examine the meaning of the proverb to err is human; to forgive, divine, where the expression came from, and some examples of its use in sentences.

To err is human; to forgive, divine means that it is the nature of a human being to make mistakes, because humans are not perfect. However, forgiving someone for his mistakes is an imitation of the mercy of God. Of course, the idea is that it is good and moral to forgive people for their human failings. The expression to err is human; to forgive, divine was written by English poet Alexander Pope in his An Essay on Criticism, Part II, written in 1711. The expression to err is human is much older, however. It is based on a sentiment expressed by Plutarch, who lived in the first century. A.D. Plutarch said: “For to err in opinion, though it be not the part of wise men, is at least human.” Often, only the first part of the proverb, to err is human, is quoted as an excuse for making a mistake.

Examples

Superintendent Iline Tracey, who is black, had recommended that Roblee be demoted rather than fired Monday as she quoted poet Alexander Pope, saying “to err is human, to forgive divine,” according to the report. (New York Post)

As the saying goes “to err is human, to forgive divine.” (Harvard Business Review)

To err is human, so don’t be embarrassed to show just how human you are. (Forbes)