An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure is a proverb with roots in medieval times. We will examine the meaning of the proverb an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, where the expression came from, and some examples of its use in sentences.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure means it is easier to take small steps to prevent something from happening than dealing with a problem once it is established. Another way to state the definition: It is easier to avert a problem than try to repair a problem. The expression an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure was popularized by Benjamin Franklin in the 1700s, though the sentiment dates by the thirteenth century in Jurist Henry De Bracton’s work, De Legibus, which was written in Latin. Like most proverbs, a speaker may only cite the first half of the proverb, an ounce of prevention, assuming that the listener will supply the rest of the sentence for himself.

Examples

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” he said of masks and vaccines. (Odessa American)

To all those folks who refuse to wear masks, remember the adage, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” (The Republic)

“As in the old adage, ‘An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure’ for reducing black bear conflicts.” (Crookston Times)

Help Us Improve!

Help Us Improve!

- Did we make a mistake?
- Do you have feedback or suggestions on how we can improve?

press Enter

Use Shift+Tab to go back