Advertisement

All good things must come to an end

  • All good things must come to an end is a proverb with roots that stretch back to the 1300s. A proverb is a short, common saying or phrase. These common sayings are language tools that particularly give advice or share a universal truth, or impart wisdom. Synonyms for proverb include adage, aphorism, sayings, and byword, which can also be someone or something that is the best example of a group. Often, a proverb is so familiar that a speaker will only quote half of it, relying on the listener to supply the ending of the written or spoken proverb himself. Speakers of English as a second language are sometimes confused by these pithy sayings as translations from English to other languages do not carry the impact that the English phrases carry. Some common proverbs are the wise sayings better late than never, early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise, an apple a day keeps the doctor away, haste makes waste, blood is thicker than water, and a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. One of the books of the Bible is the Book of Proverbs, which contains words and phrases that are still often quoted in the English language because they are wise. Many current proverbs are quotations taken from literature, particularly Shakespeare, as well as the Bible and other sacred writings. We will examine the meaning of the expression all good things must come to an end, where it came from, and some examples of its use in sentences.


     

    All good things must come to an end is a proverb that means nothing lasts forever, all things and situations are temporary, or happiness is fleeting. It may be used to express regret when something that brings you happiness ends. The expression all good things must come to an end is an admonishment to enjoy your life today, because that happiness may not exist tomorrow. However, it is well to remember it is also true that bad things come to an end, not just good things. The idea contained in the expression all good things must come to an end originated with Geoffrey Chaucer, who wrote in his poem, Troilus and Criseyde: “But at the laste, as every thing hath ende, She took hir leve, and nedes wolde wende.”

    Advertisement

    Examples

    “Just to see this kind of end is sad. But all good things must come to an end.” (The San Francisco Chronicle)

    ‘All good things must come to an end’: The Bachelorette’s Angie Kent hints at a SPLIT with Carlin Sterritt just three weeks after the finale (The Daily Mail)

    All good things must come to an end and that includes Christmas Parade Season in the Union County area for 2019. (The Union Daily Times)

    But all good things must come to an end and this past year Willi was touring around for the last time representing the Austrian Wine Marketing Board with his last stop being in New York City in October at the prestigious Le Bernardin restaurant; their long-time wine director Aldo Sohm, who just happens to be from Austria, was present. (Forbes Magazine)


    About Grammarist
    Contact | Privacy policy | Home
    © Copyright 2009-2014 Grammarist