A fool and his money are soon parted

A fool and his money are soon parted is a proverb. We will examine the meaning of the proverb a fool and his money are soon parted, where the expression came from, and some examples of its use in sentences.

A fool and his money are soon parted means that if one has no sense or is not intelligent, he cannot maintain his wealth. The idea is that a large sum of money is wasted on a fool; he does not have the intelligence or drive to invest that money to make it grow or even know how to keep a large money safe. A fool will spend a large some of money on the first thing that strikes his fancy; he has no ability to discern a wise purchase from a silly purchase. The expression a fool and his money are soon parted was first used in its current form by Dr. John Bridge in his work, the Defence of the Government of the Church of England, written in 1587: “A fool and his money is soone parted.”

You might also be interested in reading the proverb: Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice shame on me.

Examples

If the proverb “a fool and his money are soon parted” remains true, Yancey and Grazioski won’t be the last to feel the government’s wrath. (Banker & Tradesman)

If a fool and his money are soon parted, it’s no wonder the federal government has chosen April Fool’s Day to pilfer the pockets of Canadians. (Winnipeg Sun)

A fool and his money are soon parted; in this case it’s to the tune of around RM9,000 for the full conversion and comprises all the hardware for the cosmetic procedure. (Rojak Daily)