Throw one’s hat in the ring or toss one’s hat in the ring

Throw one’s hat in the ring or toss one’s hat in the ring is an idiom. We will examine the meaning of the common idiom throw one’s hat in the ring or toss one’s hat in the ring, where it came from, and some examples of its idiomatic usage in sentences.

Throw one’s hat in the ring or toss one’s hat in the ring means to accept a challenge, to express one’s willingness to compete, to announce one’s participation in a contest. The expression throw one’s hat in the ring or toss one’s hat in the ring is most often used to mean that one is running for political office or that one is applying for a job; however, the term is also used in many other situations. The expression throw one’s hat in the ring or toss one’s hat in the ring comes from the sport of boxing, which was originally conducted in a round ring. Anyone who wished to accept the challenge for a bout threw his hat into the ring. The term came into use at the turn of the nineteenth century. Related phrases are threw one’s hat in the ring, thrown one’s hat in the ring, throws one’s hat in the ring, throwing one’s hat in the ring, tosses one’s hat in the ring, tossed one’s hat in the ring, tossing one’s hat in the ring.

Examples

At Wednesday’s Harrietstown Republican caucus, former town supervisor Bob Bevilacqua threw his hat in the ring again, making the race for the town’s top spot a contested one. (Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Earning over a quarter of a million dollars between Wednesday and Saturday nights, Overton threw his hat in the ring as the hottest racer in America, next to fellow Georgian Jonathan Davenport. (Chattanoogan)

Political newcomer Dee Jones has tossed his hat in the ring to vie with incumbent Mayor Holly Daines for Logan’s top elected post. (Cache Valley Daily)

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