On the same page

On the same page is an idiom with origins that are more recent than you think. We will examine the meaning of the idiom on the same page, where it came from, and some examples of its use in sentences.

On the same page is an expression that means two or more people are in agreement or are starting with the same body of knowledge or assumptions. On the same page means they are of one mind or are thinking in the same manner. The idiom on the same page can not be traced any further back than the 1970s. Some believe that the phrase comes from the admonition that members of a choir must all be singing from the same page of music. Others believe it comes from the idea that everyone working from a book in a class or seminar must be all studying the same page.

Examples

Andre Iguodala told NBC Sports Bay Area that, as of Sunday, he and the Grizzlies were “on the same page” as the beginning of training camp looms. (The Commercial Appeal)

Season 3 left off with Randall (Sterling K. Brown) and Beth (Susan Kelechi Watson) finally getting on the same page with their marriage. (Newsweek)

“Frankly speaking, I’m on the same page” as Trump regarding the 2-percent requirement, Kaljulaid—an earnest, 49-year-old socially liberal policy wonk who in style is Trump’s polar opposite—told us. (The Atlantic)

“The girls are a special group of girls and they’re all on the same page about their goals and what they want to accomplish,” Lane said. (The Orange County Register)