Console vs console

Console and console are two words that are spelled identically but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, which makes them heteronyms. We will examine the definitions of the words console and console, where these words came from, and a few examples of their use in sentences.

Console (kun SOHL) is a verb that means to comfort someone, to relieve someone’s sadness, disappointment or grief. Console is a transitive verb, which is a verb that takes an object. The word console is derived from the Latin word Latin consolari, which means to comfort. Related words are consoles, consoled, consoling, consulation, consolable.

Console (KAHN sohl) is a noun that means a unit that contains all the controls for mechanical equipment or electronic equipment. Console may also mean the cabinet that contains mechanical equipment or electronic equipment. The word console may be derived from the Latin word consolidare, which means to make solid.

Examples

When it was over and they walked off the 18th green, Faldo put his arm around Norman’s shoulder and tried to console him. (The New York Post)

“While this is terrifying, it also consoles me because it tells me that if my brothers can be sacrificed, if my brothers can suffer for the sake of the Gospel, then it should make me open to every possibility in this life.” Said Peter Ameh, a second-year seminarian of Jalingo Diocese in Nigeria. (The Vatican News)

Nintendo has been unable to keep up with demand for the Switch, and the console is sold out everywhere. (Business Insider)

Asked for his favorite Leyland story, Gott went with something that happened during his first stint with the Pirates, when players kicked in a bunch of money and bought Leyland a console TV, presenting it to him before the penultimate home game of the season. (Pittsburgh Post Gazette)