Advertisement

Swashbuckle

The verb swashbuckle means to perform adventurous acts in a flamboyant manner, usually using a sword. It also means to act as a swashbucklerIt can also be an adjective in the form swashbuckling. One can also be swashbuckled or swashbuckling.

History


Advertisement

In the 1500s, swash meant to dash or strike violently and a buckler was a shield. So a swashbuckler was someone who swashed his or her buckle by striking it with his or her sword.

Examples

The move for Arturo Vidal appears to have hit the buffers but Ángel di María and the Dutch midfielder Jordy Clasie are targets to add some swashbuckle to United’s midfield. [Guardian]

Robin Hood and his band of merry men will swashbuckle their way across the Lebowsky stage as the Owosso Community Players present “Robin Hood,” opening Friday at the Lebowsky Center for two weekends. [Argus Press]

But the VFA had a large and fanatical following in the 1970s and 1980s — it was common for fans to support a league team on Saturdays and an association team on Sundays — and a cluster of great players and compelling characters. There was Dandenong spearhead Jim ‘Frosty’ Miller. Feared Preston ruckman Harold Martin. Cook’s Port Melbourne teammate and champion big man Vic ‘Stretch’ Aanensen. Bearded Coburg swashbuckler Phil Cleary. [Herald Sun]

If you fancy making a swashbuckling sword or shield, go along on Monday afternoons. [Plymouth Herald]

Still, Kline could have swashbuckled if necessary. [The New Yorker]

He hasn’t exactly been swashbuckling going forward yet, but his crossing ability has also improved the team. [Roker Report]

Advertisement

Check Your Text

Speak Your Mind

advertisement
About Grammarist
Contact | Privacy policy | Home
© Copyright 2009-2014 Grammarist
Ad will be closed in 5 sec.

Sign up for our mailing list

Sign up for our mailing list