Armor vs. armour

Armor is the American spelling of the noun meaning a protective covering. Armour is the preferred spelling in all the other main varieties of English. Other than the spelling, there is no difference between the words.

Examples

For example, these non-U.S. publications use armour:

He has been training for two months, first starting with a vest and then adding bits of armour gradually. [BBC News]

A new study, published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, shows that these odd-looking armoured creatures can spread leprosy. [Globe and Mail]

The vehicles are widely used by SWAT teams in the US, and feature advanced bulletproof and blastproof armour and ballistic glass windows. [Canberra Times]

And these American publications use armor:

The men wore heavy body armor even to the latrine inside their base. [NPR]

He seemed infinitely powerful—he had pierced America’s armor, after all—and impossible to reach. [Los Angeles Times]

Emotions, I learned, could be regarded as a chink in the pro-choice armor. [New York Daily News]

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