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Wont vs won’t

Wont describes a usual behavior, a habitual behavior, to become used to a habitual behavior. Wont may be used as a noun, adjective or verb. Wont comes from the Old English gewunod in the past participle, wunian, which means to dwell, to become accustomed. Won't is a contraction of will not. The word won't appears in the mid-1400s as wynnot, it morphs into wonnot in the 1580s and took its current form as won't in the 1660s. Examples The crooning superhero promised, as is his wont, to Make … [Read more...]

Culpable vs liable

Culpable means deserving blame, guilty, morally responsible. Culpable may be used in a legal sense or a non-legal sense. Culpable is derived from the Latin word culpabilis, which means blame-worthy. Related words are culpability, culpably, culpableness. Liable means legally responsible. Liable does not imply moral responsibility, one may be liable or legally responsible for something actually outside of one's control. Liable might also mean susceptible to, or likely. Liable comes from the … [Read more...]

High five

A high five is a congratulatory gesture or greeting between two people. To perform a high five, one person raises his hand in the air, open-palmed, and the other person slaps the open palm. High five may also be used as a verb, related terms are high fives, high fived, high fiving. The high five is an American invention originally performed by athletes congratulating each other, though there is some dispute as to who invented the gesture. It is presumed to have originated in the 1970s. The low … [Read more...]

Crave vs craven

Crave means to want something with an overwhelming desire, to need something urgently. Crave may also mean to beg for something. Crave is a verb, related words are craves, craved, craving, craver. Crave comes from the Old English word crafian, meaning implore or demand. Craven means cowardly, faint of heart in a contemptible manner. Craven may be used as an adjective or a noun, related words are cravenly and cravenness. Craven comes from the Middle English word cravant, meaning defeated. As … [Read more...]

Wreak vs wreck

Wreak means inflict vengeance, to cause harm, to unleash anger. Wreak is a verb, related words are wreaks, wreaked, wreaking, wreaker. Wreak comes from the Old English word wrecan, which means to avenge, to punish. Wreak is pronounced with a long e sound. Wreck means to cause or be involved in the destruction of something, to spoil or damage something or be involved in spoiling or damaging something. Wreck may be used as a noun or a verb, related terms are wrecks, wrecked, wrecking. Wreck is … [Read more...]

Dominant vs predominant

Dominant means most influential, having the greatest importance. Dominant also means exerting the greatest influence over others. In genetics, dominant describes characteristics which are heritable even if only one parent carries the genes for those characteristics. Dominant may be used as either an adjective or a noun. The word dominant comes from the Latin word dominant, meaning ruling, governing. Predominant means most influential, having the greatest importance. Predominant also means … [Read more...]

Disparity vs disparateness

Disparity means a great dissimilarity, a wide difference between two or more items, people or circumstances. Disparity is related to disparate and comes from the Middle French word disparit√©, which in turn comes from the Latin word disparitas meaning inequality. The plural form of disparity is disparities. Disparateness also means a great dissimilarity, a wide difference between two or more items, people or circumstances. Disparateness is also related to disparate, derived from the Latin word … [Read more...]

Diaspora

A diaspora is a body of people that have been dispersed outside their homeland. Diaspora may also refer to the action of dispersing a body of people outside their homeland. When capitalized as in Diaspora, the word refers to the dispersion of Jews from their homeland after the Babylonian and Roman conquests or the Jewish people and Jewish communities existing outside of Palestine after the Babylonian and Roman conquests. The word diaspora comes from the Greek word diaspeirein, meaning to … [Read more...]

Temblor, tremblor or trembler

A temblor is an earthquake or earth tremor. The word temblor first appears in 1876 and is an American word inspired by the Spanish word temblor, which means shake or tremble. The plural form may be either temblors or temblores. A tremblor is also an earthquake or earth tremor. The word tremblor first appears in America in 1913, and seems to be a mashup of the words temblor and trembler. Many English-speakers do not consider tremblor a legitimate English word, but it is found in the Oxford … [Read more...]

Ne’er-do-well

A ne'er-do-well is someone who is no good, a good-for-nothing, an irresponsible, lazy, worthless human being. Ne'er-do-well is hyphenated. Ne'er-do-well is a contraction of the phrase never-do-well, it appears in the 1730s from Scotland. The word ne'er has been around since the 1200s, first used in Scotland and North England. Ne'er-do-well may be used as a noun or as an adjective. The use of the phrase ne'er-do-well peaked in the 1920s and 1930s. Today it is considered a somewhat antiquated … [Read more...]

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