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Hot spot or hotspot

Hot spot and hotspot are compound words. We will examine the definition of these terms, when to use hot spot or hotspot, and some examples of that use in sentences.A hot spot is a popular place teeming with activity, a dangerous place where civil unrest or a military incursion is likely or a volcanic area. It is sometimes used to mean an area where one may connect to the wireless internet. There are three different types of compound words in the English language: closed compound words, … [Read more...]

First aid

First aid is a term with its roots in warfare. We will examine the definition of the term first aid, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.First aid is assistance that is rendered to an injured or ill person by a bystander until professional medical help may arrive. Some first aid is elementary, such as applying a bandaid to a cut. Other first aid requires training, such as the process of CPR or cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Associations such as the Red Cross provide … [Read more...]

Satisficing vs satisfying

Satisficing and satisfying are two words that are quite similar in pronunciation and spelling, but have very different meanings. We will examine the definitions of satisficing and satisfying, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences.Satisficing describes something that meets the minimum requirements of a goal, performing something at a satisfactory level rather than at the maximum level possible. It is a strategy for decision making that was introduced by … [Read more...]

Come-hither look

The term come-hither look first appeared around the turn of the twentieth century. We will examine the meaning of the phrase come-hither look, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.A come-hither look is a one that is sexually inviting, a glance that is flirtatious or seductive. The term come-hither look first appeared around 1895 in newspapers as a way to express a woman's sexual designs in a euphemistic manner. Hither is a word that means this place, the place where I … [Read more...]

Fusillade vs fuselage

Fusillade and fuselage are two words that are spelled and pronounced similarly, but have very different meanings. We will examine the definitions of the words fusillade and fuselage, where these terms came from and some examples of their use in sentences.A fusillade is a succession of shots fired in quick succession or simultaneously. The word fusillade may also be used metaphorically, as in a fusillade of criticism. Fusillade may be used a noun or a verb, related terms are fusillades, … [Read more...]

Swatch vs swath

Swatch and swath are two words that are very close in pronunciation and spelling, but have very different meanings. We will examine the definitions of swatch and swath, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences.A swatch is a small piece of cloth that serves as a sample. Often, swatches are collected in books to be used in designing and decorating. Swatch may also refer to any small sample, such as a paint swatch. A new use of the word has emerged to mean to try … [Read more...]

Cut-throat

The word cut-throat belongs to an interesting subset of compound words found in the English language. We will look at the definition of the word cut-throat, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.A cut-throat situation, competition or method describes one that is intensely competitive or ruthless, one in which no mercy is shown. Most often, cut-throat is used as an adjective, but it may be used as a noun to mean a murderer, someone who is liable to literally cut a … [Read more...]

Brandish vs brand

Brandish and brand are two words that sound as if they should be related, but they are not. We will examine the definitions of brandish and brand, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences.Brandish means to wave something around, either in excitement or as a threat. Most commonly, brandish is heard in the term to brandish a sword. Even though sword fighting has gone out of style in real life, it is still seen in RPG or role playing games, books and movies. … [Read more...]

Vernacular

The term vernacular has been in use for about four hundred years. We will examine the meaning of the word vernacular, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.The vernacular is the vocabulary, grammar, expressions, idioms and phrases that are spoken by ordinary people, within a given area. Vernacular is used with the word the when used as a noun, as in the vernacular. Vernacular may also be used as an adjective. The vernacular differs from slang, which is language that is … [Read more...]

Apprehensive vs reprehensive

Apprehensive and reprehensive are two words that are very similar in pronunciation and spelling, and are often confused. We will examine the definitions of the word apprehensive and reprehensive, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences.Apprehensive describes the feeling that something bad will happen, or feeling anxious or uneasy about the future. Apprehensive is an adjective, related words are the nouns apprehension and apprehensiveness as well as the adverb … [Read more...]

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