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Slumgullion and goulash

Slumgullion and goulash are two words that are sometimes used interchangeably, but in reality have a difference in meaning. We will look at the definitions of the words slumgullion and goulash, where the words come from and some examples of their use in sentences. A slumgullion is a stew, usually made up of whatever is at hand but containing at least component of meat. The word slumgullion is an American word first seen in print in the 1870s in the story Roughin' It by Mark Twain. However, in … [Read more...]

Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth

Don't look a gift horse in the mouth is a proverb, which is a well-known saying that expresses a universally accepted truth. We will explore the meaning of the proverb Don't look a gift horse in the mouth, its origins and some examples of its use in sentences. Don't look a gift horse in the mouth is an admonishment to be grateful when receiving a present and not to find fault with that present. A horse's teeth change as it ages, and looking in its mouth is a good way to judge the health and … [Read more...]

Infuse vs suffuse

Infuse and suffuse are two words that look and sound similar, but have slightly different meanings. We will look at the difference between the words infuse and suffuse, where the words come from and some examples of their use in sentences. Infuse means to fill something, to inject with something, to instill something. In a medical sense, to infuse means to allow a liquid to flow into a vein. Infuse may also mean to soak something in a liquid in order to extract flavor or medicinal properties. … [Read more...]

Rot vs wrought

Rot and wrought are two words that are pronounced similarly but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are homophones. We will look at the definitions of the words rot and wrought, where these terms come from and some examples of their use in sentences. Rot means to decompose, to decay due to bacterial action. Rot may be used as a noun or a verb, related words are rots, rotted, rotting, rotten. The word rot is also used in British English to mean teasing or nonsensical … [Read more...]

Turpitude vs turpentine

Turpitude and turpentine are two words that are very similar in pronunciation and spelling and are easily confused. We will examine the difference between the words turpitude and turpentine, where the terms come from and some examples of their use in sentences. Turpitude means wicked behavior or having a depraved character. The word is most often used in the term moral turpitude, which is a legal concept that signifies conduct that is in opposition to a community's standards of good and moral … [Read more...]

Helpless vs hapless

Helpless and hapless are two words that are pronounced similarly and spelled similarly, but have different meanings. We will look at the definitions of the words helpless and hapless, where they come from and some examples of their use in sentences. Helpless describes someone who cannot defend himself, someone who is unable to provide for himself or cope with life, someone weak. The word helpless is derived from the Old English word help and the suffix -less from the Old English word læs. … [Read more...]

Kith and kin

Kith and kin is a very old term, dating back to the 1300s. We will look at the definition of the term kith and kin, how it has evolved, and some examples of its use in sentences. Kith and kin refers to one's friends and family, one's relations. Kith and kin dates back to the fourteenth century, however the word kith first appeared in the eighth century. Kith is derived from the Old English words cȳthth and cynn and carried the meaning, of one's native land. In other words, the original … [Read more...]

Restrict vs constrict

Restrict and constrict are two words that are easily confused. They have subtly different meanings. We will look at the definitions of restrict and constrict, where the words come from and some examples of their use in sentences. Restrict means to put limits on something, to keep something within certain boundaries and under control, to limit movement, to limit choices. Restrict is a transitive verb, which is a verb that takes an object. Related words are restricts, restricted, restricting, … [Read more...]

Freudian slip

Freudian slip is a popular term for a psychological concept. We will look at the definition of this word, where it comes from, the scientific word for this phenomenon and some examples of Freudian slip's use in sentences. A Freudian slip is a mistake in speech or writing that accidentally reveals someone's subconscious desires, fears or feelings. In psychological terms, Freudian slip may also encompass misreading or mishearing something, losing certain objects or forgetting something. The … [Read more...]

Explicit vs implicit

Explicit and implicit are two words that are opposite in meaning, they are antonyms. We will look at the full definitions of explicit and implicit, where the words come from and some examples of their use in sentences. Explicit describes something that is plainly and clearly stated, something that is communicated in a fashion that leaves no room for interpretation or confusion. Explicit may also refer to something that is sexually graphic, leaving nothing to implication or the imagination. … [Read more...]

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