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Synecdoche

  • Synecdoche (from Greek, meaning literally¬†simultaneous understanding) is a figure of speech in which one of the following occurs:


     

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    • A part of something is used for the whole (e.g., hands for sailors, Ol’ Blue Eyes for Frank Sinatra).
    • A whole is used for a part (e.g., the law for police).
    • A specific is thing is used for a general thing (e.g., John Hancock for signature, Coke for all colas, Wall Street for the financial industry).
    • A non-specific term is used for a specific thing (e.g., the good book for The Bible).
    • A material is used for the object made of that material (e.g., plastic for credit card).
    • A container is used for its contents (e.g., flask for liquor).

    Comments

    1. Chris Johnston says

      What is the difference between synecdoche and metonymy, then?

    2. Jake Daniel says

      Your third dot-point has a syntax error. “A specific is thing is…”

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