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One-trick pony

The idiom one-trick pony is not as old as you may think. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. An idiom can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when the origin of the idiomatic expression is lost. … [Read more...]

If you can’t beat them, join them

The phrase if you can't beat them, join them is a proverb that has only been traced as far back as the 1930s. A proverb is a short, common saying or phrase that particularly gives advice or shares a universal truth. Common proverbs are phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. Sometimes, only the beginning of a proverb is quoted, the speaker assuming that the listener can supply the rest of the quote … [Read more...]

Supply and demand

The phrase supply and demand was first used in the mid-eighteenth century, though the concept goes back thousands of years. We will examine the definition of the expression supply and demand, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. Supply and demand is a description of the relationship between the availability of goods and the desire for those goods in a society. Often referred to as the law of supply and demand, it is an economic theory that explains where the law of … [Read more...]

Three-ring circus

The expression three-ring circus has a literal meaning and also a figurative meaning, which is an idiom. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. An idiom can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when … [Read more...]

Rose-colored glasses

The idiom rose-colored glasses has been in use since at least the 1840s, though its exact origin is in dispute. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. An idiom can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning. We … [Read more...]

Cut to the quick

The phrase cut to the quick is one of those English idioms with a long history, derived from a word that is rarely used in present day. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. An idiom can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that … [Read more...]

In two shakes of a lamb’s tail

In two shakes of a lamb's tail is an idiom with a few variations. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. An idiom can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when the origin of the idiomatic expression … [Read more...]

Rake over the coals and haul over the coals

Rake over the coals and haul over the coals are idioms. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Common idioms are used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. An idiom can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when the origin of the idiomatic expression is lost. We will examine the … [Read more...]

Goosebumps, goose pimples and gooseflesh

The compound words goosebumps, goose pimples and gooseflesh are interchangeable, though the popularity of each of these expressions has ebbed and flowed over time. Compounds or compound words are words that are derived from two separate words joined together. We will examine the definition of the words goosebumps, goose pimples and gooseflesh, where these they came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Goosebumps, goose pimples and gooseflesh are bumps that appear on the skin when … [Read more...]

Jersey vs guernsey

Jersey and guernsey are two words that are similar in pronunciation but are spelled differently and have different meanings. We will examine the definitions of jersey and guernsey, where these two words came from as well as some examples of their use in sentences. A jersey is 1.) a knitted top with long sleeves 2.) a shirt worn as a uniform for a certain sport and team 3.) a type of soft, draping fabric 4.) a breed of cattle. Jersey dairy cattle are fairly small, weighing between 800 and 1200 … [Read more...]

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