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Blind side vs blindside

The words blind side and blindside are both compound words, but with a difference. We will examine the definitions of the words blind side and blindside, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Blind side is a noun that means the direction in which a person can not see well, the side in which a person does not have a clear view, the side away from where a person is directing his gaze. Blind side is an open compound word, which is a word derived from two … [Read more...]

Might vs mite

The words might and mite are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. Homophones exist because of our ever-changing English language. The way the spelling and definitions differ can be confusing. Pronunciation may change, even though the spelling doesn’t, producing two words that are pronounced in the same manner but have different meanings such as night and knight. English words are also spelled according to their … [Read more...]

Celiac vs celeraic

Celiac and celeraic are two words that are often confused. We will examine the differing definitions of celiac and celeraic, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Celiac refers to an auto-immune disease or allergy involving reactions to gluten, which is present in wheat, rye and barley. Celiac may refer to the disease or the person who has the disease. If a celiac eats gluten, it destroys the lining of the intestine, causing diarrhea, malabsorption of … [Read more...]

Cryptid

Cryptid is a word that was coined in the 1980s. We can trace the origin of this word directly to its first use, which is highly unusual in etymology. We will examine the definition of the word cryptid, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. A cryptid is a creature or animal that has not been proven to exist. A cryptid may be presumed to be an animal that was declared extinct but has not really become extinct, such as a dinosaur or saber toothed tiger. A cryptid may be … [Read more...]

Show one’s cards and tip one’s hand

Show one's cards and tip one's hand are two idioms that are derived from the same literal source, though they have a subtle difference in meaning. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than … [Read more...]

Were vs we’re

Were and we're are two words that are often confused, especially if the writer does not understand the function of the apostrophe in the middle of a word. We will examine the meanings of the words were and we're, where they came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Were is the past tense of the verb to be. It is used with the second person singular and plural (with the pronoun you), the plural past (with the pronouns we or they), and the subjunctive mood (statements that are … [Read more...]

Correspondence vs correspondents

Correspondence and correspondents are two words that are close in spelling and so close in pronunciation that many believe they are homophones. Homophones are words that are pronounced in the same manner, but are spelled differently and have different meanings. We will examine the definitions of the words correspondence and correspondents, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Correspondence may mean a close connection or similarity between two items or an … [Read more...]

Noblesse oblige

The term noblesse oblige came into use in Great Britain in the 1830s. We will examine the meaning of the phrase noblesse oblige, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. Noblesse oblige is a noun that means the obligation that a member of the privileged class has toward the less privileged class. The idea is that someone who has been blessed with good fortune by virtue of his birth, luck or opportunities should feel a responsibility in good conscience to help those who … [Read more...]

Bling

Bling is a word that has been in use for about thirty years, though some may find it confusing. We will examine the definition of the word bling, where it came from, and some examples of its use in sentences. Bling means flashy or ostentatious jewelry, clothing or accessories that sparkle and glitter denoting wealth and an affinity for material possessions. Bling carries the connotation of being over the top. Things that may be construed as bling are cufflinks, earrings such as drop earrings … [Read more...]

Side hustle

Side hustle is a term that has come into popular use fairly recently, though it may be a little older than you think. Side hustle may be considered a compound word, which is a word derived from two separate words used together. New compound words usually consist of two, separate words, and are called open compound words. Midway through their evolution, compound words may acquire hyphens between the two words. When a compound word becomes a closed compound word, which consists of two words joined … [Read more...]

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