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Imprecation vs implication

Imprecation and implication are two words that are close in spelling and pronunciation, but have very different meanings. We will examine the definitions of imprecation and implication, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Imprecation may mean a curse, or it may mean something exceedingly hostile or angry that is spoken to someone or about someone. Imprecation is a noun, the verb forms are imprecate, imprecates, imprecated, imprecating, and the … [Read more...]

Whitewash

Whitewash is a closed compound word that has a literal meaning and a figurative or idiomatic meaning. Compounds or compound words are words that are derived from two separate words joined together, a closed compound word does not contain a space or hyphen. We will examine the meaning of the word whitewash both literally and figuratively, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. Today, the word whitewash is most often used as an idiom to mean to hide, conceal or cover up … [Read more...]

Carved in stone, set in stone and written in stone

Carved in stone, set in stone and written in stone are three idioms that are interchangeable in meaning. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. An idiom can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when … [Read more...]

In a nutshell

In a nutshell is an idiom with its roots in Greece, nearly two thousand years ago. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. An idiom can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when the origin of the … [Read more...]

A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush

A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush is a proverb. A proverb is a short, common saying or phrase that particularly gives advice or shares a universal truth. Common proverbs are phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. Sometimes, only the beginning of a proverb is quoted, the speaker assuming that the listener can supply the rest of the quote for himself. Many English as a Second Language … [Read more...]

Hindsight is 20/20 and 20/20 hindsight

Hindsight is 20/20 and 20/20 hindsight are two versions of the same idea. We will examine the meaning of the expressions hindsight is 20/20 and 20/20 hindsight, where they came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Hindsight is 20/20 is a proverb that means it is easy to understand something after it has already happened. The expression hindsight is 20/20 is usually said in answer to an admonishment that the person should have known something would happen, or that the person made … [Read more...]

Deaf vs deft

Deaf and deft are two words that are similar in spelling and pronunciation, but have very different meanings. We will examine the definitions of deaf and deft, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. The word deaf describes the an inability to hear, an inability to perceive and process auditory input.  Most audiologists, professionals who treat hearing problems, divide the degrees of deafness into four categories: mild, moderate, severe and profound. … [Read more...]

Wobble vs warble

Wobble and warble are two words that are very close in pronunciation and spelling, but have different meanings. We will examine the definitions of wobble and warble, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Wobble means to move side to side in a jiggly fashion, to move unsteadily in a particular fashion as if unbalanced, an oscillation in one's movements. Wobble is also used figuratively to mean to vacillate, to waver in one's convictions or in one's course of … [Read more...]

One-trick pony

The idiom one-trick pony is not as old as you may think. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. An idiom can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when the origin of the idiomatic expression is lost. … [Read more...]

If you can’t beat them, join them

The phrase if you can't beat them, join them is a proverb that has only been traced as far back as the 1930s. A proverb is a short, common saying or phrase that particularly gives advice or shares a universal truth. Common proverbs are phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. Sometimes, only the beginning of a proverb is quoted, the speaker assuming that the listener can supply the rest of the quote … [Read more...]

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