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See eye to eye

The phrase see eye to eye is an idiom. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when the etymology or origin of … [Read more...]

Stir up a hornets’ nest and stir up a hornet’s nest

Stir up a hornets' nest and stir up a hornet's nest are two versions of an an idiom that came into use in the latter half of the eighteenth century. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can … [Read more...]

The ball is in your court

The ball is in your court is an idiom that came into use in the latter half of the twentieth century. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase … [Read more...]

Impetus vs emphasis

Impetus and emphasis are two words that are similar in pronunciation and are often confused. Learning English as a second language can be challenging. The phonetic speech sounds can be hard to distinguish, even for those who speak English as their native language. Language acquisition happens over time, with practice in speaking and reading in the chosen second language. We will examine the difference in the definitions of the words impetus and emphasis, where they came from, and some examples … [Read more...]

Junkyard dog

Junkyard dog is an idiom that came into use in the latter half of the twentieth century. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a … [Read more...]

Confirmation bias

The term confirmation bias has recently been added to the Oxford English Dictionary, though it has been in use for some time. English is a living language and changes often with the addition of new words and phrases taken from other languages, local regions, and various fields of business and study. We will examine the definition of the expression confirmation bias, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. Confirmation bias is a cognitive bias that is the tendency for a … [Read more...]

Clam up

Clam up is a idiom that came into use in the twentieth century. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when … [Read more...]

Sorted vs sordid

Sorted and sordid are two commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way when spoken aloud but are spelled differently and mean different things, which makes them homophones. Homophones exist because of our ever-changing English language, and are a challenge for those who wish to learn to speak English. The way the spelling and definitions differ can be confusing when attempting to learn vocabulary correctly. Proper pronunciation of spoken English may help the listener distinguish … [Read more...]

Call it a day and call it a night

Call it a day and call it a night are idioms that came into use in the twentieth century. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a … [Read more...]

Coups vs coos

Coups and coos are two commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way when spoken aloud but are spelled differently and mean different things, which makes them homophones. Homophones exist because of our ever-changing English language, and are a challenge for those who wish to learn to speak English. The way the spelling and definitions differ can be confusing when attempting to learn vocabulary correctly. Proper pronunciation of spoken English may help the listener distinguish … [Read more...]

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