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Search Results for: period

Full stop vs. period

In American English, period is the term for the punctuation mark used to end declarative sentences. In British English, the mark is usually called a full stop. Neither term is right or wrong. They're just different ways of saying the same thing. Full stop for the punctuation mark may be slightly older than period, but both date from the late 16th century. Period derives from the Latin periodus, meaning a complete sentence. Exactly how period went from this to referring to the dot at the end … [Read more...]

Periodic vs. periodical

Something that is periodic (1) happens at regular intervals, or (2) is intermittent. Periodical means published at regular intervals, and it doubles as a noun referring to something that is published at regular intervals. The words were originally variants of each other, and some dictionaries still list periodical as a variant of periodic, but they are generally kept separate in 21st-century usage.  Related -ic/-ical words Periodic and periodical constitute just one of many -ic and … [Read more...]

Period (full stop or full point)

In modern English, the period (or full stop, as it's known in British English, and sometimes full point) has two main purposes: 1.  A period ends a sentence that is not a question or an exclamation. The period at the end of this sentence is an example. 2.  Periods follow abbreviations and contractions---although this is becoming less common, especially in the use of acronyms and initialisms. In British and Australian English, it is standard practice to use periods when abbreviating … [Read more...]

Incomplete comparison

An incomplete comparison is an error in the use of English grammar. Grammar is the way in which language is structured, the rules that are the foundation of that structure and the study of those rules. Grammar is the way words are used together to form sentences. Grammar includes punctuation such as periods, commas, apostrophes, colons, semicolons, quotation marks and parentheses; parts of speech such as nouns, pronouns, prepositions, verbs, conjunctions; modifiers such as adjectives and … [Read more...]

Days vs daze

Days and daze are two commonly confused words that are pronounced in the same way when spoken aloud but are spelled differently and mean different things, which makes them homophones. Homophones exist because of our ever-changing English language, and are a challenge for those who wish to learn to speak English. The way the spelling and definitions differ can be confusing when attempting to learn vocabulary correctly. Proper pronunciation of spoken English may help the listener distinguish … [Read more...]

Go pear-shaped

Go pear-shaped is primarily a British idiom. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when the etymology or … [Read more...]

Lionize and lionise

Lionize and lionise are two spellings of the same word, which many find confusing. We will examine the definition of lionize and lionise, where these words came from, when each spelling should be used, and some examples of their use in sentences. Lionize and lionise mean to treat someone as if he were important, to hail someone as a celebrity, to bestow public approval and accolades upon someone. Synonyms for lionize and lionise that may be found in a thesaurus are idolize, revere, admire. … [Read more...]

Go to the mat and take it to the mat

Go to the mat and take it to the mat are different forms of the same idiom. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, … [Read more...]

Penny for your thoughts

A penny for your thoughts is an idiom that goes back hundreds of years. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even … [Read more...]

Retronym

Retronym is a term that was coined in the 1980s and takes a bit of description. We will examine the meaning of the term retronym, who coined it, and some examples of its use in sentences. A retronym is a term that is created by pairing a modifier with an existing word to denote what the original version of the modified word meant. The modifying word may be an adverb if the retronym is a verb, but a retronym is almost always a noun, and the modifying word is an adjective. Evolving technology … [Read more...]

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