Graduate vs graduate

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Graduate vs graduate

Graduate and graduate  are two words that are spelled identically but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, which makes them heteronyms. We will examine the definitions of the words graduate and graduate, where these words came from, and a few examples of their use in sentences.  Graduate (GRAD yew ut) is a person who has completed a course of study at a college, university, secondary school, or other institution. The plural form is graduates. The word graduate is derived from the Latin, gradus, which …

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Contentious vs conscientious

Contentious and conscientious are two words that are close in spelling and pronunciation and may be considered confusables. Confusables is a catch-all term for words that are often confused in usage. Two words or more than two words may be confused because they are similar in spelling, similar in pronunciation, or similar in meaning. These commonly confused words may be pronounced the same way or pronounced differently or may be spelled the same way or spelled differently, or may have different meanings …

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Estimate vs estimate

Estimate and estimate  are two words that are spelled identically but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, which makes them heteronyms. We will examine the definitions of the words estimate and estimate, where these words came from, and a few examples of their use in sentences.  Estimate (ESS tuh mate) means to make a rough calculation or rough judgement about something: its cost, size, quantity, value, quality, etc. Estimate is a transitive verb, which is a verb that takes an object. Related words are …

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Construct vs construct

Construct and construct  are two words that are spelled identically but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, which makes them heteronyms. We will examine the definitions of the words construct and construct, where these words came from, and a few examples of their use in sentences.  Construct (kun STRUKT) is means to build something, to put something together, or make something either literally or figuratively. One may construct a building, or one may construct an idea. Construct is a transitive verb, which is a verb …

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Compress vs compress

Compress and compress  are two words that are spelled identically but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, which makes them heteronyms. We will examine the definitions of the words compress and compress, where these words came from, and a few examples of their use in sentences.  Compress (come PRESS) is a verb that means to squeeze or flatten, to make smaller by crushing or constricting. Compress may mean to press two things together. Compress means to reduce the size of something; it may be used …

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Crooked vs crooked

Crooked and crooked  are two words that are spelled identically but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, which makes them heteronyms. We will examine the definitions of the words crooked and crooked, where these words came from, and a few examples of their use in sentences.  Crooked (KROOKT) is the past tense of the verb, crook, which means to bend or curve out of shape. Related words are crook, crooks, crooking. Crooked is a transitive verb, which is a verb that takes an object. The …

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Represent vs represent

Represent and represent  are two words that are spelled identically but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, which makes them heteronyms. We will examine the definitions of the words represent and represent, where these words came from, and a few examples of their use in sentences.  Represent (reh preh ZENT) means to serve as a symbol of something, to stand in for someone else or to be appointed to speak for someone else, to be a typical example of something, or to function as a …

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House vs house

House and house  are two words that are spelled identically but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, which makes them heteronyms. We will examine the definitions of the words house and house, where these words came from, and a few examples of their use in sentences.  House (howss) means a place where people live, a family dynasty, a shelter, a religious institution, or a deliberative body. House is used as a noun or an adjective; the plural form is houses. The word house is derived …

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Agape vs agape

Agape and agape  are two words that are spelled identically but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, which makes them heteronyms. We will examine the definitions of the words agape and agape, where these words came from, and a few examples of their use in sentences.  Agape (uh GAYP) is a modifier that means wide open; often the word agape is used to describe someone’s mouth that is wide open in surprise. The modifier agape is derived from gapa, which is an old Norse word …

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Mobile, mobile, or Mobile

Mobile, mobile, and Mobile  are words that are spelled identically but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, which makes them heteronyms. We will examine the definitions of the words mobile, mobile, and Mobile, where these words came from, and a few examples of their use in sentences.  Mobile (MOH bull) is an adjective that means movable, traveling, capable of change, mixing within social groups, or not stationary. Mobile is also used informally to mean a cell phone or other untethered computing device. The …

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