Surplus vs surplice

Surplus refers to an amount in excess of what is required, more than what is necessary. In accounting, a surplus is the amount of assets in excess of the total liabilities. Surplus enters the English language in the late fourteenth century, derived from the Old French word sorplus which means remainder, extra. Surplus may be used as a noun or an adjective.

A surplice is a an outer vestment worn at some Christian services by choir members, servers and clergy. A surplice is a loose, wide-sleeved, white vestment that extends anywhere from the hip to the knee in length. Originally, surplices were worn over fur garments that clergy wore inside cold medieval churches, the word surplice comes from the Medieval Latin word superpellicium meaning a garment worn over fur. In fashion, a surplice neckline is a diagonally crossed neckline that creates a deep v-shape.



Both Dayton and Senate DFL leaders indicated they could support seeing some of the surplus spent directly on projects to bolster the state’s transportation infrastructure. (The Minneapolis Star Tribune)

Nov 5 Surplus annual production of diesel, gasoline and kerosene in China will double to nearly 30 million tonnes by 2020 from last year’s level, boosted by increasing output from independent refiners, according to an industry research paper. (Reuters)

Zesco, senior manager, in charge of generation, Ernest Banda said in Lusaka that Zambia is likely to record an energy surplus by the end of next year, as long as investors in energy, the public and all stakeholders participated effectively. (Times of Zambia)

There were the Thursday night practices run by Mr Smith (or Smithy as he was known to us), the church organist and choirmaster, and wearing our cassock and surplice for services on Sunday mornings and evenings under the beady eyes of the Rev George Rivers, who would pound the pulpit during his sermons. (The Derby Telegraph)

The simple sweater dress had a surplice neckline and was adorned with two leather buckles at the waistline. (The Daily Mail)



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