Advertisement

Strop vs strap

Strop and strap are two words that are spelled and are pronounced in similar ways but do not mean exactly the same thing. We’ll look at the difference in meaning between the words strop and strap, their origins and some examples of their use in sentences.

The word strop may refer to two different items. The first item is a razor strop, which is a length of rough leather used to sharpen razor blades. The second item known as a strop is a rope or metal band used in moving cargo. In addition, throw a strop is a British idiom which means to throw a temper tantrum. Strop is also used as a verb to mean to sharpen a razor blade on a length of rough leather. Related words are strops, stropped, stropping. The word strop is derived from the Latin word stroppus.


Advertisement

A strap is a length of fabric, leather or other material used to carry something or secure something. Strap also describes the loops hanging from the ceiling in public transportation that commuters may hold onto in order to remain on their feet. Finally, the strap refers to a beating with a whip. The word strap may be used as a a noun or a verb, related words are straps, strapped, strapping. The word strap is also derived from the Latin word stroppe. Remember, a strop is a type of strap that is used for a few very specific purposes.

Examples

Years later, his father beat him with a razor strop, and Hemingway would hide with a loaded shotgun and place his father’s head in the crosshairs. (Esquire Magazine)

It’s not that we offer such a generous corporate tax rate, it’s just that having done so we insist that we don’t really want multinationals to pay any tax at all in case they might throw a strop. (The Irish Examiner)

According to Apple Insider, the patent includes descriptions for a transparent smartwatch strap that would contain the color-changing fluid. (The International Business Times)

Advertisement

Check Your Text

Speak Your Mind

advertisement
About Grammarist
Contact | Privacy policy | Home
© Copyright 2009-2014 Grammarist