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Scrip vs script

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  • Scrip and script are two words that are close in spelling and pronunciation, but have different meanings. They are often confused. We will examine the differing definitions of scrip and script, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences.


     

    Scrip is a certificate which entitles the bearer to something, such as stock shares or dividends. Scrip may also mean a currency issued by a company or the military that may be used in the company store or at the military exchanges. Company scrip is usually considered a method of price-gouging employees, charging them exorbitant prices for goods. Military scrip has been used to thwart money speculation in war-torn areas.  Arcade tokens and subway tokens are also considered scrip. The word scrip came into use in the 1760s as an abbreviation of the term subscription receipt, regarding stocks.

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    Script may mean handwriting, or it may mean the printed text of a play or film. Script is used as a verb to mean to write the text of a play or film, related words are scripts, scripted, scripting. The word script is derived from the Latin word scriptum which means a piece of writing.

    Examples

    Street Talk understands Tawana’s joint venture partner, Singapore-listed Alliance Mineral Assets Ltd, is seeking to buy the company in a scrip based merger.  (The Australian Financial Review)

    The HBL wants to test the notion, frequently offered by NCAA dead-enders, that people will stop caring about college sports if the athletes are compensated in something other than company scrip. (The Huffington Post)

    But he has increasingly been discarding the traditional Republican script to emphasize his own populist themes. (The Washington Examiner)

    She said she and other anchors were told in early March that they were going to record a promotional video for the station, but didn’t see the script until after CNN first reported its contents. (The Register-Guard)


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