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Porch vs veranda or verandah

  • Porch and veranda or verandah are words that are sometimes used interchangeably, but in fact, have slightly different meanings. We will examine the definitions of porch and veranda or verandah, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences.

    A porch is a covered area that is attached to the front of a house or other building. A porch is external, however, it may include various types of railings, columns and screens. The word porch is derived from the Latin word porticus, which means a portico, a covered walkway, a city gate.

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    A veranda is a covered area that is attached to the front and the sides of a house or other building. A veranda is external, but may include various types of railings, columns and screens. A veranda is also known as a wrap-around porch. The American spelling is veranda, the British spelling is verandah. The word veranda is derived from the Portuguese word varanda, which means long balcony.

    Examples

    In Richmond, Virginia, people debate their favorite sky blue paint color for porch ceilings as they do their favorite biscuit recipe. (The ShoreLine Times)

    A 68-year-old woman was shot while on her porch Monday evening in the West Lawn neighborhood on the South Side. (The Chicago Sun-Times)

    Bakkavor’s Bourne Prepared Produce staff including Jane Spurden and Elias Hernandez (pictured) headed to The Cedars Care Home on Friday with paintbrushes and tins of paint and breathed new life into the veranda which was looking worn out. (The Rutland and Stamford Mercury)

    A poor widow and her three girl children are living outside the verandah of a person’s house as they have no house of their own in Lahunipada block. (The Daily Pioneer)

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