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Mr., Mrs., Ms. and Miss

Mr., Mrs., Ms. and Miss are titles that are used before surnames or full names as a sign of respect. We will look at the definition of these terms, where they come from, when to use them and some examples of their use in sentences.

Mr. is a title used before a surname or full name of a male, whether he is married or not. Mr. is an abbreviation for Mister, it is pronounced like the word Mister. The abbreviation Mr. has been in use since the fifteenth century, it is a variant of the word master. Master is still occasionally used as a title for a boy, there is no abbreviation.

Mrs. is a title used before a surname or full name of a married female. Mrs. is an abbreviation for the word Missus, it is pronounced like the word Missus. The abbreviation Mrs. has been in use since the sixteenth century, it is a variant of the word mistress.


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Ms. is a title used before a surname of full name of a female whether she is married or not. Ms. has been in use since the 1950s, it is a portmanteau of the words Miss and Missus. The title of Ms. was popularized by Ms. magazine in the 1970s. Miss is a title used before a surname or full name of an unmarried female. Miss is an abbreviation of mistress. Note that each of these common titles are capitalized.

Examples

Three components of Mr. Trump’s platform and statements seem to be underlying such a view: a big surge of spending on infrastructure, corporate tax cuts, and (financial and business) de-regulation. (The Huffington Post)

Mrs. Brown’s Boys has picked up three National Television Awards, TV Choice Awards, three Scottish BAFTAs, four IFTA awards, a TV Times Award, Royal Television Society Winner and a TV BAFTA for Best Situation Comedy to being a ratings smash across the globe. (The Manchester Evening News)

Ms. Clinton is a Methodist girl raised up in her church. (The Washington Post)

But that is exactly what we have with Tim Burton and MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN, a gloriously goth, visually imaginative and engaging film yet with a caring, sweet edge that finds Tim Burton once again at the top of his game and almost assuredly, at the top of the box office. (The Culver City Observer)

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