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Include, exclude or occlude

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  • Include, exclude and occlude are three words that are related but have different meanings. We will examine the definitions of the word include, exclude and occlude, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences.


     

    Include means to make something a part of a set or make something a part of a whole, to enclose something, to add someone into an activity or allow them a privilege. Related words are includes, included, including, inclusion. The word include is derived from the Latin word includere, which means to shut in or enclose.

    Exclude means to keep something separate, to not allow someone into an activity or not allow someone a privilege, to take something out of consideration. Related words are excludes, excluded, excluding, exclusion. The word exclude is derived from the Latin word excludere, meaning to shut out or keep out.

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    Occlude means to obstruct, to shut in, or to cover an eye in order to obstruct vision. Occlude may also mean fitting the teeth together properly. Related words are occludes, occluded, occluding, occlusion. The word occlude is derived from the Latin word occludere, which means to shut up, to close.

    Examples

    If your planned cottage garden will include a hybrid tea rose, you’d better put it where you can easily get to it to do necessary pruning and maintenance. (The Idaho Statesman)

    Public school districts earlier this year sought to exclude vendors from contracts based on a company’s work for charter schools, according to emails and documents obtained by The Texas Monitor. (The Texas Monitor)

    The stands and terraces are usually high enough to occlude any views of the urban landscape beyond the stadium walls. (The Times)

    An embolus can be big enough to occlude a coronary or a cerebral artery, resulting in either a myocardial infarction (heart attack) or stroke respectively. (The Guardian)

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