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Explicit vs implicit

Explicit and implicit are two words that are opposite in meaning, they are antonyms. We will look at the full definitions of explicit and implicit, where the words come from and some examples of their use in sentences.

Explicit describes something that is plainly and clearly stated, something that is communicated in a fashion that leaves no room for interpretation or confusion. Explicit may also refer to something that is sexually graphic, leaving nothing to implication or the imagination. Explicit may also be used as a noun to indicate the end of a manuscript, it was often used by medieval scribes. The word explicit is derived from the Latin word explicitus  which means unobstructed, related words are explicitly and explicitness.

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Implicit describes something that is not clearly expressed, something expressed indirectly, something communicated in a fashion that is implied. Implicit may also refer to something inherent, something that is inextricably connected with another thing. Thirdly, implicit may describes something that is without question or absolute. The word implicit is derived from the Latin word implicitus, which means confused or entangled. Related words are implicitly and implicitness.

Examples

Although he declined to offer Mr Trump any explicit advice, he said he’d been served well by selling his assets and investing them in Treasury bills. (The Australian)

The head of Ant Financial Services Group, the payment affiliate of Alibaba Holdings Ltd, apologized on Tuesday following backlash from Chinese netizens over a social feature in the company’s payment app that critics say enabled a sexually explicit dating service. (Reuters)

In a 58-page report that has been circulated before Friday’s Council of Australian Governments meeting between the prime minister and the premiers, Finkel has also given implicit endorsement to an emissions intensity trading scheme for the electricity industry to help manage the transition to lower-emissions energy sources. (The Guardian)

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