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Equinox vs solstice

The equinox is the time when the sun crosses the celestial equator, which makes day and night very nearly of equal length. An equinox occurs twice a year, the vernal equinox marks the first day of spring and the autumnal equinox marks the first day of fall. Equinox is derived from the Medieval Latin word equinoxium, meaning equality of night and day.

The solstice is the time when the sun reaches either its year-high point in the sky at noon, or when the sun reaches year-low point in the sky at noon. A solstice occurs twice a year. The summer solstice occurs when the sun is at its year-high point in the sky at noon, it is the first day of summer and the longest day of the year. The winter solstice occurs when the sun is at its year-low point in the sky at noon, it is the first day of winter and the shortest day of the year. The word solstice comes from the Latin word solstitium which means point at which the sun appears to stand still.


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Examples

Serenity welcomed in the Vernal Equinox which meant blooming flowers and perfect temperatures, the ideal time for desert camping. (The Huffington Post)

The question was that different Jewish and Christian communities calculated the date in different ways and it became an event which more or less coincided with the rebirth of agricultural life in Spring in the northern hemisphere, the day depending on where you lived, and so at the Council of Nicaea in 325 AD it was established that the first Sunday after the first full moon on or after the Spring (Vernal) Equinox would be Easter Sunday, and from there, the period of Lent would be counted (backwards, starting from Easter Sunday and going back 40 days). (Pravda)

A monumental row has broken out before the summer solstice after druids protested against a £15 “pay to pray” parking charge at Stonehenge. (The Telegraph)

A protest by angry druids and pagans at plans by English Heritage to ban alcohol and charge £15 to park there for the summer solstice next month blockaded access to Stonehenge for hundreds of tourists this morning. (The Western Daily Press)

 

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