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Collaborate vs corroborate

Collaborate means to work with others on a project, to create something in conjunction with others. During World War II, collaborate also came to mean to cooperate with the enemy, as a back-formation of collaborator. Collaborate is a verb, related words are collaborates, collaborated, collaborating, collaborator, collaborative, collaboratively. Collaborate comes from the Late Latin word collabōrāre, meaning to come together, to work together.

Corroborate means to strengthen a theory, idea, finding or fact with supporting evidence. Corroborate may be used as an adjective or verb, related words are corroborates, corroborated, corroborating, corroboration, corroborative, corroboratory, corroboratively, corroborator. Corroborate comes into the English language in the 1530s, meaning to give legal confirmation, from the Latin word corroborare meaning to strengthen, to invigorate.


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Examples

Alec Baldwin, Scott Eastwood to collaborate on cop thriller (The Indian Express)

Concrete Beach and Carnival Cruise Line Collaborate on Brewery at Sea (The Miami New Times)

The collaboration, which was announced in mid-December between the two companies, aims to provide a “seamless flow” of information between the Trimble Connected Farm solution, a web-based farm management solution that includes wireless data transfer, and Encirca Services, which are tailored decision services offered by DuPont Pioneer. (The Farm and Ranch Guide)

The defendant’s 16-year-old girlfriend told the court that he had been with her all night at a club, but refused to identify any friends or other witnesses who could corroborate that he was there. (The Guardian)

Still, to corroborate my thesis, I reached out to Genna Cifelli, a college teen (and my future sister-in-law) who has a smartphone surgically grafted onto her palm. (The Huffington Post)

The drama came to ahead on the most recent episode, with the women confronting Lisa over her actions – including her loyal ally Kyle, who refused to corroborate her version of event. (The Daily Mail)

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