Bromide can refer to a compound that includes the element bromine. Some of these compounds can be used in medicine to make a person calm or sleepy.

Another definition can be a person that is tiresome, or a statement that is intended to make someone happier or calmer but in reality is trite or ineffective.


The adjective form is bromidic.


Never has the bromide “less is more” seemed more appropriate. [The Boston Globe]

In the hospitality industry, dressing to impress isn’t just some old bromide. It’s a matter of business. [Pittsburgh Post-Gazette]

Running for the Illinois state legislature, he said he stood “for all sharing the privileges of the government, who assist in bearing its burthens” – a Jacksonian bromide that was expected. [The Guardian]

But they have refused to do the hard policy work of deciding what specific circumstances (such as real concurrent enforcement benchmarks that go beyond vague bromides about securing the border) they will require as part of a compromise they can embrace that would actually accomplish that. [The Washington Post]

As an analyst of the game, as anyone who has watched him on ITV would know, Ireland’s assistant manager rarely moves beyond tired old bromides. [Irish Independent]

She certainly didn’t waste the Commons’ time any more than those suck-ups who use the floor of the House to offer bromidic congratulations to the national football team or birthday wishes to members of the Royal Family. [London Evening Standard]


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