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Aerobic vs anaerobic

Aerobic is an adjective that describes a thing or process that requires oxygen. The plural form, aerobics, is used to mean a type of exercise that benefits the cardiovascular system by pumping quantities of oxygen through the blood. The adverb form is aerobically. The word aerobic is derived from the Greek prefix aero-  which means air and the Greek word bios which means life.

Anaerobic is an adjective that describes a thing or process that does not require oxygen. Anaerobic exercise is short and intense, it uses energy stored in the muscles and does not require large quantities of oxygen. The adverb form is anaerobically. The word anaerobic is derived from the Greek prefix an- which means without, the Greek prefix aero- which means air and the Greek word bios which means life.


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Examples

Valiyasala councilor Lekshmi M made an emotional appeal to the health standing committee chairman K Sreekumar to hasten the process of setting up aerobic bins in her wards. (The New Indian Express)

The preseason training regimen has been an extension of what Martin called a “great summer with lots of aerobic work.” (The Austin American-Statesman)

Using microbial metagenomics, which extracts and sequences DNA from all cells in a milk sample, his lab showed a whole new world of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria inside the mammary glands of both healthy and diseased cows. (The Cornell Chronicle)

The firm’s state-of-the-art ReFood anaerobic digestion plant recycles more than 160,000 tonnes of food waste per year, generating 5 megawatt hours (MWh) of electricity via combined heat and power (CHP), alongside hot water and heat. (The Renewable Energy Magazine)

A spokesman for Lincoln-based J.H. Walter Planning and Energy Services, said: “We understand there has been continued local interest about the planning application for an anaerobic digestion plant for W. D. Branton on land to the south of Counter Drain Drove, Tongue End.” (The Spalding Guardian)

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