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Hour vs our

Hour and our are two words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are homophones. We'll look at the definitions of hour and our, where the words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. An hour is a measurement of time. An hour is sixty minutes long, or one twenty-fourth of a day. The word hour may also be used to indicate a certain time of day according to the clock or a certain period of time that is allotted for a … [Read more...]

Forth vs fourth

Forth and fourth are two words that are pronounced in the same manner but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are homophones. We'll look at the meaning and origin of forth and fourth, the difference between them, and look at a few examples of their use in sentences. Forth means moving forward in space, time or degree, to progress away from a starting point, to emerge from hiding or inaction. Forth is an adverb that is generally considered a more literary or formal word, … [Read more...]

Need vs knead

Need and knead are two words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and mean different things. Need and knead are homophones. We'll look at the reason that some English words begin with the dipgraph kn, the difference between the words need and knead, and some examples of their use in sentences. Need may be used as a verb to mean to lack something, to be in want of something, to require something. Need may be used as a noun to mean the state of feeling the lack of … [Read more...]

Red vs read

Red and read are two words that are pronounced in the same way but mean two different things. In addition, read is one of those strange words that when used as a verb can be pronounced in two different ways, changing the tense. We'll look at the meaning of the words red and read and some examples of their use. Red is a color, the word red may be used as an adjective or as a noun. Red is one of the primary colors, which are the three basic colors from which all other colors may be mixed. The … [Read more...]

Buy, by or bye

Buy, bye and by are homophones. These words are all pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings. We'll look at the difference in meaning between buy, bye, and by, where these words are derived from and some examples of their use in sentences. Buy means to acquire something in exchange for payment. Buy is also used figuratively to mean to acquire someone's favor or loyalty by means of bribery, or to acquire something through extreme effort or sacrifice. … [Read more...]

Braid vs brayed

The words braid and brayed look similar and are pronounced in the same fashion, but mean very different things. Braid and brayed are homophones, which are words that are pronounced the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings. We'll look at the meanings of these words, their origins, and some examples used in sentences. A braid may be threads composed of various materials woven into a band used to trim garments or upholstery. A length of hair that has been interwoven … [Read more...]

Koan vs cone

A koan is a riddle, a paradoxical problem used in Zen Buddhism in order to demonstrate that logic and reason are sometimes inadequate. A koan is employed to stimulate enlightenment, koans have been used in Zen Buddhism at least since the twelfth century. Some famous koans are "When you can do nothing, what can you do?" and "What is the sound of one hand clapping?" These riddles are designed to provoke a shift in perception. The word koan is a Japanese word, a combination of the character ko … [Read more...]

Heard vs herd

Heard is the past and the past participle form of the verb hear, meaning to perceive a sound with one's ear, to listen to, to receive information, to listen to a legal case. The root word of heard, hear, is one of the Oxford English Dictionary's one thousand most frequently used words. The word heard is derived from the Old English word herde. Related words are hears, hearing, hearer, hearable. Herd refers to a large group of animals that live together. Usually, the word herd refers to hoofed … [Read more...]

Offal vs awful

Offal is the edible entrails and internal organs of an animal, offal may also mean decomposing organic material. Offal may be used figuratively to describe refuse or waste material of any kind. The word offal is a mass noun, which is a noun that describes something that cannot be counted, there is no plural form. Offal is derived from the Dutch word afval, which means fallen off, describing the parts of an animal that "falls off" of the butcher's block. Awful means nasty, unpleasant, very … [Read more...]

Hay vs hey

Hay is grass that has been cut and dried in order to use as feed for animals. Hay is often baled or bound in bundles shaped like squares or rounds. The word hay may also describe a certain country dance. Hay may be used as a noun or a verb, when describing the act of cutting and baling hay. Related words are hays, hayed, haying. Hay is derived from the Old English word, heg. Hey is an exclamation that is used to attract attention, to express surprise or dismay. In American English, hey is a … [Read more...]

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