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Flower vs flour

A flower is the part of the plant that bears seeds. The flower includes sepals, petals and stamens and is often large in proportion to other parts of the plant and colorful. The flower is the blossom. Flower can also mean the finest example of something or a time of optimum growth, flower also means the time at which a plant blooms. Related words are flowers, flowered, flowering, flowerless and flowerlike. Flower is a word in English as early as 1200, from the Latin flos meaning flower.

Flour is grain or another comestible ground into powder. Flour is usually made from wheat. Flour may also come from a number of other sources such as barley, corn, oat, chickpea, almond, coconut, etc. Flour is used in baking bread, pastries and cakes, among other things, or as a thickener. The word flour is also used as a verb to mean applying flour to a surface. Flour was spelled as flower until 1830, when the spelling was changed to avoid confusion. Flower and flour sound similar when pronounced, but the word flower consists of two syllables and the word flour consists of one syllable.


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Examples

“[We’ve got] people doing dry cleaning on-demand in Dubai; marijuana dispensaries in Los Angeles; flower delivery companies in South Africa; and we’re dealing with a whole heap of transport companies in India, so every day is pretty exciting,” MacDonald said. (The Sydney Morning Herald)

No, it’s not quite the flower power, free love, camper vans that you might have imagined but the premise of Marlborough’s Friendship Force is simple: building friendships across the world, across cultural, political, ethnic and economic boundaries will be the foundation of world peace. (The Marlborough Express)

The federal Food and Drug Administration has agreed to review a long-delayed petition to fortify corn masa flour with folic acid, a move advocates say is crucial to preventing devastating birth defects like those seen in an ongoing cluster of cases in Washington state. (The Seattle Times)

Add flour, stirring vigorously until a soft dough forms, about 2 minutes. (The Times Free Press)

 

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