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FOMO

The acronym FOMO has been in use since the turn of the twenty-first century. An acronym is an abbreviation that is formed by taking the initial letters of the words in a phrase and creating a new word that is pronounceable. We will examine the meaning of the term FOMO, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. FOMO is an acronym that stands for the phrase fear of missing out. It has been in steady use since the early 2000s, its popularity fueled by the internet. Someone … [Read more...]

In the cards and on the cards

The idioms in the cards and on the cards have the same meaning. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of in the cards and on the cards, where these phrases came from and some examples of their use in sentences. The expressions in the cards and on the cards describe something that is most probably going to happen, something that is destined to … [Read more...]

Blench vs blanch

Blench and blanch are two words that are similar in spelling and pronunciation, with overlapping meanings. We will examine the definitions of blench and blanch, where these two words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Blench means to flinch, to shrink away because of fear or because of pain. Blench may also mean to become pale or to be drained of color. Blench is a verb, related words are blenches, blenched, blenching. The word blench is derived from the Old English word … [Read more...]

Latchkey kid and latchkey child

The terms latchkey kid and latchkey child are interchangeable and have their roots in World War II. We will examine the definition of latchkey kid and latchkey child, where these terms came from and some examples of their use in sentences. A latchkey kid or latchkey child is one who is home alone after school, until a parent arrives home from work. A latchkey kid or latchkey child is typically left alone for only a few hours, on weekdays. The term was first used during the 1940s in Canada, … [Read more...]

Curmudgeon

The word curmudgeon has been in use since the 1500s, though many find it confusing. We will examine the definition of curmudgeon, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. A curmudgeon is an ill-tempered old person, usually a man. A curmudgeon is cantankerous, surly and mean. The origin of the word curmudgeon is up for debate. One theory is that it is derived from the French term cœur méchant, meaning bad-hearted. This theory is not widely accepted. Another possible origin … [Read more...]

The worse for wear

The phrase the worse for a wear is an idiom that dates back several hundred years. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of the expression the worse for wear, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. The phrase the worse for wear describes someone or something that has been used and shows signs of that use. Something that … [Read more...]

Imitate vs intimidate

Imitate and intimidate are two words that are often confused. We will examine the definitions of imitate and intimidate, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences. Imitate means to copy someone or something, to ape someone or something, to use someone or something as a model for behavior. Imitate is a transitive verb, which is a verb that takes an object. Related words are imitates, imitated, imitating, imitator, imitation, imitative. The word imitate is a … [Read more...]

The world is one’s oyster

The idiom the world is one's oyster dates back to the 1600s. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the meaning of the expression the world is one's oyster, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. The world is one's oyster means that the person being spoken about has every advantage necessary to achieve what he wishes to achieve, and to … [Read more...]

Devil vs bedevil

Devil and bedevil are two words that are related. We will examine the definitions of devil and bedevil, where these terms came from and some examples of their use in sentences. A devil is a demon or evil entity. Devil may also be used metaphorically to mean an evil person. When capitalized as in the Devil, it refers to the supreme demon or Satan. Devil is most often used as a noun, but in Great Britain it can mean to act as an assistant to a barrister or other professional. In the United … [Read more...]

Underdog

Underdog is an idiom that originated in the United States. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of the word underdog, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences. An underdog is the person in a contest or competition who is the least likely to win that contest or competition. An underdog begins a contest or competition at a … [Read more...]

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