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Parkour

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  • Parkour is a twenty-first century word that has its roots in the military. We will examine the definition of the word parkour, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.

    Parkour is a sport or discipline that involves rapidly negotiating an urban area by climbing, jumping or vaulting over obstacles without pause. Practitioners use no equipment, other than light running shoes. The discipline of parkour is derived from French obstacle course training that was practiced before World War I,  known as parcours du combattant. The founder of parkour is David Belle, a Frenchman. He established a group known as the Yamakasi. Parkour is also known as free running, and participants are known as traceurs. The sport of parkour moved into the public consciousness in the early 2000s when parkour videos appeared on the YouTube channel. Parkour is a mass noun, which is one that represents something that can not be counted and therefore has no plural form.

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    Examples

    Frankel and her son were attending a birthday party Saturday night when the incident happened at Vault PK, a parkour gym in Barrio Logan that houses obstacles like the ones on “America Ninja Warrior.” (The San Diego Union Tribune)

    ST understands that the incident, which happened on Nov 2, involved a group of foreign parkour enthusiasts who call themselves Team Storror. (The Straits Times)

    A rural-style parkour event, where participants use canine-like dexterity to clear logs, fences and farm equipment, is on again after being an unlikely showstopper last year. (The Herald Sun)

    He has now teamed up with Lorean Biet and Pawel Van Der Steen, of the Sheffield Parkour Movement, to launch plans to bring parkour – a form of exercise which involves leaping between obstacles – to communities in south Sheffield. (The Star)

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