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Blooper

A blooper is an error, a mistake. For the most part, blooper refers to a mistake that an actor or member of the crew makes in a movie, television show or radio show. Bloopers were first collected in the 1950s by Kermit Schaefer, from radio shows. He compiled these bloopers into record albums. Television shows consisting of movie, television and sports bloopers first became popular in the 1970s and 1980s. The word blooper was coined from the word bloop, which was a term used in American radio in the 1920s to refer to a terrible, annoying feedback noise that affected nearby radios when users tuned their sets incorrectly. Today, YouTube is rife with blooper videos. Another term for bloopers is outtakes, though an outtake is not necessarily humorous and a blooper is generally assumed to be humorous.


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Examples

Marvel have released a blooper reel from the Avengers’ movie, Age of Ultron, that hit theatres earlier this year. (The New Zealand Herald)

The former Nice player has made only three appearances in all competitions this season, with his blooper against Olympiacos in the Champions League forcing Wenger to reconsider his options at the back. (The International Business Times)

JAMES Pattinson’s embarrassing no-ball blooper reel at the MCG could rob Josh Hazlewood of a home Test in Sydney. (The Daily Telegraph)

Pia sincerely wished Miss Colombia well, and promised that Steve Harvey’s blooper will open doors for her. (The Manila Bulletin)

‘Genertaion For the Next’: Spelling blooper at Scottish Labour conference sparks merciless mocking from rivals (The Daily Record)

Garo Yepremian, the former NFL kicker who helped the Miami Dolphins win consecutive NFL championships but is best remembered for a Super Bowl blooper, died Friday of cancer. (The New York Post)

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