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Cry all the way to the bank

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  • The idiom cry all the way to the bank was popularized by an American entertainer in the 1950s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of the phrase cry all the way to the bank, where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.


     

    To cry all the way to the bank is a comment on how unimportant one’s detractors are in the face of one’s success. For instance, the producers of a movie that received bad reviews from professional critics but was popular with the public might say the reviews made them cry all the way to the bank. In other words, the reviews did not matter to the producers because the movie was commercially successful. The person credited with popularizing the term cry all the way to the bank was Liberace, an American entertainer popular from the 1950s through the 1970s. The term cry all the way to the bank is sometimes incorrectly interpreted to mean to feel one does not deserve his success. This is a misunderstanding of the sly sarcasm inherent in the term cry all the way to the bank. Related phrases are cries all the way to the bank, cried all the way to the bank, crying all the way to the bank.

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    Examples

    Secular press people like myself were offered a Friday a.m. screening on opening day; I opted instead to pay for a Thursday night preview, so cast and crew may cry all the way to the bank about this review since they got my fourteen bucks nonetheless. (Forbes Magazine)

    She once said that she cried all the way to the bank when people gently mocked her va-va-voom style. (The  Daily Mail)


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