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Born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth

Born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth is an English idiom. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal meaning.  We will examine the definition of the term born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth, where the phrase came from and some examples of its use in sentences.

To be born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth means to be born with all the advantages, to be born into a rich family. This, of course, is based on the fact the utensils of poor people would be made of lead, tin or pewter, while the upper classes owned utensils made out of precious metals such as silver. The earliest known use of the term born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth is from a translation of Don Quixote published in 1719. Certainly this indicates that the phrase born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth was known before that time. As with many idioms and proverbs, only the first part of the phrase, born with a silver spoon is often quoted. The listener is expected to fill in the latter half of the phrase for himself.

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Examples

It is an issue close to her heart as she raised her son Shiia while a single mother and, as she puts it, “wasn’t born with a silver spoon in my mouth”. (The Royal Gazette)

Needless to say, 39-year-old Laps—that’s his nickname—was born with a silver spoon in his mouth, which he immediately had gold-plated and diamond-­encrusted, then filled with cocaine (hello, Mr. DeLorean!) and later heroin. (Car and Driver Magazine)

Speaking on his growing up, Doggext said, he was not born with a silver spoon, adding that, “I grew up in a lot of places, but Mushin is the place that puts a mark on the person I have become today.” (The Nigerian Tribune)

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