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Won vs one

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  • Won and one are two words that are often confused. They are pronounced in the same fashion but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the difference between the definitions of won and one, where these terms came from and some examples of their use in sentences.

    Won is the past tense of the verb win, which means to be victorious in a game or contest, to emerge on top, to be the most successful, to gain someone’s approval or support through persuasion or example. Win may be used as a noun or a transitive verb, which is a verb that takes an object. The word won is derived from the Old English word winnan, which means to work at, to toil, to fight.

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    One is a number that corresponds to a single thing, it is more than zero and less than two. One is the lowest cardinal number. One is also used as an unspecific pronoun. One may also mean the same as or identical, or to signify two things that have been joined together seamlessly. The word one is derived from the Old English word ān. Why one is pronounced in the manner it is now pronounced is unknown. We do know that up until the fourteenth century, one was pronounced in a way that rhymes with phone or alone. In the 1300s in the west and southwest of England, the current pronunciation was first recorded.

    Examples

    Fashion diplomacy: China’s First Lady and 7 other stateswomen who won the world with style (The South China Morning Post)

    The Tar Heels missed four consecutive free throws in the closing seconds but won the game with two season-saving offensive rebounds, first by Theo Pinson, who tipped the ball out to Joel Berry II who was promptly fouled, and then by Kennedy Meeks, that eventually ran out the time on the clock to secure the victory. (USA Today)

    Authorities have released one man and detained another in connection with a fatal shooting in Lancaster on Friday night, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. (The Los Angeles Times)

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