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Sunday vs sundae

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  • Sunday and sundae are two words that are pronounced in the same manner but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the definitions of the words Sunday and sundae, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences.

    Sunday is the day of the week that precedes Monday and follows Saturday. Traditionally, Sunday has been set aside in the Christian religion as the sabbath and a day of rest. In most Western countries, Saturday and Sunday are considered the weekend. In most Middle Eastern countries, the weekend consists of Friday and Saturday. The word Sunday is derived from the Old English word sunnandæg, which means day of the sun. The days of the week were named after Latin terms. Note that Sunday is capitalized, as are all names of the days of the week. The plural form is Sundays.

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    A sundae is an ice cream dish consisting of various toppings that may include fruit, nuts, candies, syrup or whipped cream. Originally, the expression ice cream sundae was spelled in the same way as the name of the day, as in ice cream Sunday. There is some dispute as to the exact time and place that the term ice cream Sunday became ice cream sundae, though many ascribe the change in spelling to religious protests against using the Lord’s Day to denote a dessert. In any case, some time in the nineteenth century the term ice cream sundae was invented in the United States. The plural form is sundaes.

    Examples

    Volunteers throughout Hampton Roads have until Sunday to sign up as citizen-scientists to help measure the upcoming king tide — the highest astronomical tide of the year. (The Daily Press)

    The district-level inauguration of the project will be held at Perambra on Sunday, in which Minister for Labour and Excise T.P. Ramakrishnan will be the guest of honour. (The Hindu)

    In Dominic Dorsey’s world, the city of Two Rivers and its claim to fame as the home of the ice cream sundae is in jeopardy. (The Herald Times Reporter)

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